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These Are Boston's Most Iconic Meat Dishes

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In honor of The Five Days of Meat, here are Boston's most iconic meat dishes, spanning numerous neighborhoods, price points, and cuisines. While we are not focusing on seafood during other parts of The Five Days of Meat, we deemed it appropriate to include several seafood dishes under the "meat" umbrella in this particular map. Boston is truly a seafood town, and leaving out lobster rolls and chowder felt like a glaring omission. Note that the numbers are not rankings; the map points are ordered geographically from north to south. Feel free to chime in with your own thoughts by leaving a comment below. Without further ado, here are Boston's 20 most iconic meat dishes.


· All coverage of The Five Days of Meat on Eater [~EBOS~]

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Kelly's Roast Beef

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410 Revere Beach Blvd
Revere, MA 02151
(781) 284-9129
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Roast Beef Sandwich: Founded in 1951 by two people not named Kelly, Kelly’s Roast Beef started on Revere Beach and now has five locations in the Boston area, selling approximately one million roast beef sandwiches each year. Kelly’s popularized the modern New England-style roast beef sandwich, which is especially prevalent along the North Shore these days. Look for a tall pile of thinly-sliced roast beef nestled on a squishy sesame seed roll that is lightly grilled. Condiments vary, but try barbecue sauce, at the very least. Kelly’s also serves a variety of other sandwiches and seafood, but it’s the namesake dish that outsells everything else every year. [Photo: Facebook]

2. Newbridge Cafe

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650 Washington Ave
Chelsea, MA 02150
(617) 884-0134
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Steak Tips: Opened in 1975, NewBridge Cafe is a Chelsea staple that hasn’t changed much over the years, and that’s a good thing. Locals know that the sirloin tips, marinated in a "top secret" barbecue sauce, are the best around. (Theories about the recipe mention various combinations of Coke, Italian dressing, ketchup or chili sauce, and cranberry juice.) [Photo: Facebook]

3. Santarpio's Pizza

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111 Chelsea St
Boston, MA 02128
(617) 567-9871
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Lamb and Sausage Combo Plate: Santarpio’s is known best for its pizza, one of the most loved in town, so one of its meat-topped pizzas would be right at home on this list. But it’s the even meatier combo plate that fits even better - a huge charcoal-grilled sausage and a skewer of lamb, served with a side of hot cherry peppers and a crusty hunk of bread. The East Boston restaurant opened as a bakery in 1903 and began selling pizza three decades later. Nowadays, there’s a second location out in Peabody. [Photo: Official Site]

4. Craigie on Main

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853 Main St
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617) 497-5511
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Burger: Craigie on Main and its chef/owner Tony Maws have received a good deal of acclaim in general, but the press has become especially fixated on the burger over the past few years (a Bon Appetit cover, a Food & Wine "best burger" nod, and more). It’s a local, grass-fed beef burger that’s only available at Sunday brunch or in very limited quantities at the bar for dinner. Topped with Shelburne Farm cheddar and a mace ketchup and accompanied by fries, the burger starts at $17; brunch diners can add $3 for a fried egg and/or $3 for house-smoked bacon. The bun is also made in-house. For Burger Week last year, Eater National took a detailed look at the anatomy of the burger, from the bun (milk-style with sesame seeds) and the beef (includes bone marrow and suet to add fat) to the cheese (generally aged for two years) and the ketchup (hello, umami.) Not convinced to add it to your must-try list? Get an eyeful of the burger in this video from Serious Eats, where Maws talks about his "infamous and somewhat over-hyped" iconic dish. [Photo: Provided]

5. Neptune Oyster

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63 Salem St
Boston, MA 02113
(617) 742-3474
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Lobster Roll: The humble lobster roll, a New England tradition, can be found in many places around Boston, at many different price points. One of the most expensive, Neptune Oyster’s version, rings in at $27, and it’s available served hot with butter or cold with mayo. It inspires lengthy lines at all hours, and Boston Magazine has declared it the best in town in both 2009 and 2011. "This one’s a titan," writes Gourmet’s Charles Kelsey in 2008. "A huge, buttery grilled brioche bun spills over with red-fleshed lobster bounty. Whole pieces of tail, knuckle, and claw meat emerge from the split-top bun’s horizon like some sort of naked lobster uprising." [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]

6. Union Oyster House

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41 Union St
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 227-2750
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Shore Dinner: Union Oyster House, the oldest continuously operating restaurant in the country (established in 1826), is a favorite of tourists and people who like to eat at really old restaurants. The Shore Dinner is the best way to get a taste of all of the classic dishes and imagine yourself in 19th-century Boston: clam chowder, a choice of steamers or mussels, boiled or broiled lobster, and various sides, plus gingerbread or Indian pudding for dessert. [Photo: Yelp/Idy T.]

7. Durgin-Park

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340 Faneuil Hall Market Pl
Boston, MA 02109
(617) 227-2038
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Boston Baked Beans: This classic dish harks back to colonial times and is also responsible for that bean-related nickname that out-of-towners still use for our city. While Boston baked beans are not very common these days, they pop up here and there, and ye olde Durgin-Park is the perfect spot to return to the past and try the dish, which is made with molasses and salt pork. [Photo: Facebook]

8. No. 9 Park

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9 Park St
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 742-9991
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Prune-Stuffed Gnocchi: Prune doesn’t tend to make frequent appearances on upscale menus, but this elegant dish has been a No. 9 Park staple for years. The meat component? Foie gras, both in the glaze and sliced and seared on top of the gnocchi. The dish also includes toasted almonds and vin santo. "It is possibly one of the best dishes ever served in a Boston restaurant," glowed Devra First in a 2009 Boston Globe review. Seven years earlier, Mark Bittman described it as "a no-holds-barred spectacle, an elegant and excessive bank-breaker" in The New York Times, also quoting No. 9 Park owner Barbara Lynch herself as calling it "just incredible." [Photo: Facebook]

9. Parker's Restaurant

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60 School St
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 227-8600
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Baked Boston Schrod: "A Parker House tradition since 1906," reads the Parker’s Restaurant menu, referring to the cracker crumb-bedecked fish, which is served in a lemon beurre blanc with jasmine rice. The stately old restaurant at the Omni Parker House hotel is also known as the birthplace of Boston cream pie and Parker House rolls. [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]

10. Sam LaGrassa's

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44 Province St
Boston, MA 02108
(617) 357-6861
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Famous Rumanian Pastrami: Sam LaGrassa’s opened in Downtown Crossing in 1968 and has been selling countless sandwiches (self-proclaimed as "World’s No.1") to endless lines of the weekday lunchtime crowd since then. The giant sandwiches feature mountains of meat and other toppings, and the self-described "famous" pastrami, "gently smoked," is always a favorite. It currently rings in at $10.95 but tends to be big enough to feed two reasonably hungry people. [Photo: Official Site]

11. Buff's Pub

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317 Washington St
Newton, MA 02458
(617) 332-9134
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Wings: Boston’s certainly not known for its wings, but there are a few stand-outs around town, and Buff’s Pub is frequently cited as the best specimen of the true Buffalo style. "Half the bars in town serve wings, but Buff’s Pub in Newton is an undisputed master of the form," writes Devra First in the Boston Globe Magazine in 2012. "This is a known fact among wings fanatics." In addition to the true Buffalo wings, which come in a variety of heat levels, the "honey hot" wings are a popular choice, doused in Frank’s Red Hot and honey. [Photo: Foursquare/Andres T.]

12. Pho Viet's

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1095 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA 02228
(617) 562-8828
Grilled Pork Bánh Mì: There are a number of really good bánh mì options throughout Boston, particularly in pockets of Chinatown and Dorchester. But a favorite that comes up again and again is in Allston, at Pho Viet’s in the Super 88 food court. The Vietnamese sandwich includes lemongrass-marinated, grilled pork and plenty of fresh and pickled vegetables, served on a long bun that’s crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. "The sharp and sugary marinade caramelizes deeply on the grill, offering a depth of flavor that cuts through the soy- and fish-sauce-based dressing that finishes off every sandwich," writes Kenji Alt in a 2007 review in The Phoenix. The best part? It’s less than $4. [Photo: Yelp/Yuka Y.]

13. Legal Sea Foods-Park Square

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26 Park Plz
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 426-4444
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New England Clam Chowder: In general, clam chowder would have to be considered an iconic dish for Boston, and anecdotally speaking, it’s probably a top item on the Boston food bucket list of most tourists. Chowder is ubiquitous around here, and great versions aren’t too hard to find, so which restaurant’s offering should be deemed the most iconic of them all? Well, Legal Sea Foods lays claim to serving clam chowder at every presidential inauguration from Ronald Reagan through Barack Obama, so there’s that. [Photo: Facebook]

14. Jacob Wirth

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31-37 Stuart St
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 338-8586
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Wiener Schnitzel: Jacob Wirth has been open in the Theatre District since way back in 1868, serving German food in a city that doesn’t currently have much in the way of German food. The wiener schnitzel entree is a classic preparation of breaded veal tenderloin with spaetzle, also available as an appetizer or in a sandwich. [Photo: Official Site]

15. Dumpling Cafe

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695 Washington St
Boston, MA 02111
(617) 338-8858
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Mini Juicy Buns: Boston doesn’t have a huge number of restaurants that serve xiao long bao, also known as soup dumplings - Chinese steamed buns filled with broth and generally pork or a mix of pork and crabmeat. Both combinations are available at Dumpling Cafe in Chinatown, which calls them "mini juicy buns" on the menu, and it’s one of the best places in town to get them. The skin of a soup dumpling is the most essential piece of the equation; too thin, and you’ll get scalding broth leakage, but too thick, and the dough-to-filling ratio will just be off. Here, it’s just right. In a 2011 Serious Eats post, J. Kenzi López-Alt describes the dumplings as having "skins that are tender and pliant with just enough chew, thin, but not so thin that they risk breaking and spilling precious soup before they get to your mouth." [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]

16. Peach Farm

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4 Tyler St
Boston, MA 02111
(617) 482-1116
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Lobster with Ginger and Scallions: A favorite late-night industry haunt in Chinatown, Peach Farm is "Boston’s ground zero for live-tank eating," writes Boston Magazine’s Jolyon Helterman. The must-try dish is the lobster with ginger and scallions, giant hunks of juicy meat tossed in a flavorful sauce. [Photo: Foursquare/Yeein L.]

17. China King

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60 Beach St
Boston, MA 02111
(617) 542-1763
Peking Duck: The owners of the defunct King Fung Garden opened China King in 2012, and the Chinatown restaurant has quickly earned a reputation for its Peking duck feast, which feeds three or four people for around $40 and must be ordered a day in advance. After servers present the whole duck to the table, it goes back into the kitchen and comes out in three courses (skin with pancakes, a stir-fry, and then a noodle soup). "The crisp skin shatters in your mouth releasing a layer of rich, creamy duck fat," writes the Boston Globe’s Catherine Smart in a 2012 review. The stir-fry is "simple and delicious," while the soup is "flavorful" and "light." For The Phoenix (RIP), MC Slim JB reviewed the restaurant in 2012, describing the Peking Duck as "easily one of the best and most delicious deals in Chinatown, if not the city: a luxurious but budget-friendly feast." [Photo: Foursquare/Jeff G.]

18. Fenway Park

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4 Yawkey Way
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 267-1700
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Fenway Frank: While the concessions at Fenway Park - or any baseball stadium, really - tend to lean on the "I’m paying WHAT for a tiny beer?!" side, the Fenway Frank claims a spot in this iconic meat group because it’s a symbol of Boston pride, childhood outings with the family, and hot summer nights under bright stadium lights. The Fenway Frank, a beef dog, is currently made by Kayem (and can be purchased in packs of eight at most supermarkets). The company describes the flavor as "a touch of smoke and garlic," and they’re traditionally served steamed on a New England-style bun (split on top) with mustard, relish, and onion. [Photo: Official Site]

19. Hamersley's Bistro

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553 Tremont St
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 423-2700
Visit Website
Roast Chicken with Garlic, Lemon, and Parsley: Hamersley’s Bistro opened in the South End in 1987, moving to a larger space nearby - its current home - in 1993. Chef-owner Gordon Hamersley has received many accolades over the years, including a James Beard Award, for his French bistro cuisine, which he started serving in Boston long before the local rise of the upscale French bistro. His signature roast chicken, created back in the early days with his then-sous chef Jody Adams (Rialto, Trade), is well-loved. It’s currently made with Giannone free-range birds from Quebec, a popular choice amongst high-end restaurants around town. The chicken comes out moist with perfectly crispy skin thanks to the last step in the cooking process - the carved chicken is returned to its pan, which is still full of cooking liquids, and then broiled. Take a look at this 1992 episode of Julia Child’s "In Julia’s Kitchen with Master Chefs," which features the dish. [Photo: Yelp/Berk O.]

20. Sullivan's

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2080 Day Blvd
Boston, MA 02127
(617) 268-5685
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Hot Dog: Sullivan’s has been a Castle Island staple since 1951, and its seasonal opening is always one of the first signs of warm days ahead. (Generally, it’s open from late February through late November, with longer hours and lines in the summer.) While the takeout spot is known for the hot dogs, it also offers burgers, fried seafood, ice cream, and the like. The dogs, which cost a mere 15 cents back in the early days, have climbed up to $1.80, although they’re available for half the price during customer appreciation events, like opening weekend. They’re made by Kayem and served on buns that are "tossed naked onto a large flat toaster for just the right toasty-smooshed goodness." Sullivan’s has some ordering lingo to keep in mind; order your hot dog "all around," for example, to get it topped with mustard, relish, and onion. [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]

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1. Kelly's Roast Beef

410 Revere Beach Blvd, Revere, MA 02151
Roast Beef Sandwich: Founded in 1951 by two people not named Kelly, Kelly’s Roast Beef started on Revere Beach and now has five locations in the Boston area, selling approximately one million roast beef sandwiches each year. Kelly’s popularized the modern New England-style roast beef sandwich, which is especially prevalent along the North Shore these days. Look for a tall pile of thinly-sliced roast beef nestled on a squishy sesame seed roll that is lightly grilled. Condiments vary, but try barbecue sauce, at the very least. Kelly’s also serves a variety of other sandwiches and seafood, but it’s the namesake dish that outsells everything else every year. [Photo: Facebook]
410 Revere Beach Blvd
Revere, MA 02151

2. Newbridge Cafe

650 Washington Ave, Chelsea, MA 02150
Steak Tips: Opened in 1975, NewBridge Cafe is a Chelsea staple that hasn’t changed much over the years, and that’s a good thing. Locals know that the sirloin tips, marinated in a "top secret" barbecue sauce, are the best around. (Theories about the recipe mention various combinations of Coke, Italian dressing, ketchup or chili sauce, and cranberry juice.) [Photo: Facebook]
650 Washington Ave
Chelsea, MA 02150

3. Santarpio's Pizza

111 Chelsea St, Boston, MA 02128
Lamb and Sausage Combo Plate: Santarpio’s is known best for its pizza, one of the most loved in town, so one of its meat-topped pizzas would be right at home on this list. But it’s the even meatier combo plate that fits even better - a huge charcoal-grilled sausage and a skewer of lamb, served with a side of hot cherry peppers and a crusty hunk of bread. The East Boston restaurant opened as a bakery in 1903 and began selling pizza three decades later. Nowadays, there’s a second location out in Peabody. [Photo: Official Site]
111 Chelsea St
Boston, MA 02128

4. Craigie on Main

853 Main St, Cambridge, MA 02139
Burger: Craigie on Main and its chef/owner Tony Maws have received a good deal of acclaim in general, but the press has become especially fixated on the burger over the past few years (a Bon Appetit cover, a Food & Wine "best burger" nod, and more). It’s a local, grass-fed beef burger that’s only available at Sunday brunch or in very limited quantities at the bar for dinner. Topped with Shelburne Farm cheddar and a mace ketchup and accompanied by fries, the burger starts at $17; brunch diners can add $3 for a fried egg and/or $3 for house-smoked bacon. The bun is also made in-house. For Burger Week last year, Eater National took a detailed look at the anatomy of the burger, from the bun (milk-style with sesame seeds) and the beef (includes bone marrow and suet to add fat) to the cheese (generally aged for two years) and the ketchup (hello, umami.) Not convinced to add it to your must-try list? Get an eyeful of the burger in this video from Serious Eats, where Maws talks about his "infamous and somewhat over-hyped" iconic dish. [Photo: Provided]
853 Main St
Cambridge, MA 02139

5. Neptune Oyster

63 Salem St, Boston, MA 02113
Lobster Roll: The humble lobster roll, a New England tradition, can be found in many places around Boston, at many different price points. One of the most expensive, Neptune Oyster’s version, rings in at $27, and it’s available served hot with butter or cold with mayo. It inspires lengthy lines at all hours, and Boston Magazine has declared it the best in town in both 2009 and 2011. "This one’s a titan," writes Gourmet’s Charles Kelsey in 2008. "A huge, buttery grilled brioche bun spills over with red-fleshed lobster bounty. Whole pieces of tail, knuckle, and claw meat emerge from the split-top bun’s horizon like some sort of naked lobster uprising." [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]
63 Salem St
Boston, MA 02113

6. Union Oyster House

41 Union St, Boston, MA 02108
Shore Dinner: Union Oyster House, the oldest continuously operating restaurant in the country (established in 1826), is a favorite of tourists and people who like to eat at really old restaurants. The Shore Dinner is the best way to get a taste of all of the classic dishes and imagine yourself in 19th-century Boston: clam chowder, a choice of steamers or mussels, boiled or broiled lobster, and various sides, plus gingerbread or Indian pudding for dessert. [Photo: Yelp/Idy T.]
41 Union St
Boston, MA 02108

7. Durgin-Park

340 Faneuil Hall Market Pl, Boston, MA 02109
Boston Baked Beans: This classic dish harks back to colonial times and is also responsible for that bean-related nickname that out-of-towners still use for our city. While Boston baked beans are not very common these days, they pop up here and there, and ye olde Durgin-Park is the perfect spot to return to the past and try the dish, which is made with molasses and salt pork. [Photo: Facebook]
340 Faneuil Hall Market Pl
Boston, MA 02109

8. No. 9 Park

9 Park St, Boston, MA 02108
Prune-Stuffed Gnocchi: Prune doesn’t tend to make frequent appearances on upscale menus, but this elegant dish has been a No. 9 Park staple for years. The meat component? Foie gras, both in the glaze and sliced and seared on top of the gnocchi. The dish also includes toasted almonds and vin santo. "It is possibly one of the best dishes ever served in a Boston restaurant," glowed Devra First in a 2009 Boston Globe review. Seven years earlier, Mark Bittman described it as "a no-holds-barred spectacle, an elegant and excessive bank-breaker" in The New York Times, also quoting No. 9 Park owner Barbara Lynch herself as calling it "just incredible." [Photo: Facebook]
9 Park St
Boston, MA 02108

9. Parker's Restaurant

60 School St, Boston, MA 02108
Baked Boston Schrod: "A Parker House tradition since 1906," reads the Parker’s Restaurant menu, referring to the cracker crumb-bedecked fish, which is served in a lemon beurre blanc with jasmine rice. The stately old restaurant at the Omni Parker House hotel is also known as the birthplace of Boston cream pie and Parker House rolls. [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]
60 School St
Boston, MA 02108

10. Sam LaGrassa's

44 Province St, Boston, MA 02108
Famous Rumanian Pastrami: Sam LaGrassa’s opened in Downtown Crossing in 1968 and has been selling countless sandwiches (self-proclaimed as "World’s No.1") to endless lines of the weekday lunchtime crowd since then. The giant sandwiches feature mountains of meat and other toppings, and the self-described "famous" pastrami, "gently smoked," is always a favorite. It currently rings in at $10.95 but tends to be big enough to feed two reasonably hungry people. [Photo: Official Site]
44 Province St
Boston, MA 02108

11. Buff's Pub

317 Washington St, Newton, MA 02458
Wings: Boston’s certainly not known for its wings, but there are a few stand-outs around town, and Buff’s Pub is frequently cited as the best specimen of the true Buffalo style. "Half the bars in town serve wings, but Buff’s Pub in Newton is an undisputed master of the form," writes Devra First in the Boston Globe Magazine in 2012. "This is a known fact among wings fanatics." In addition to the true Buffalo wings, which come in a variety of heat levels, the "honey hot" wings are a popular choice, doused in Frank’s Red Hot and honey. [Photo: Foursquare/Andres T.]
317 Washington St
Newton, MA 02458

12. Pho Viet's

1095 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02228
Grilled Pork Bánh Mì: There are a number of really good bánh mì options throughout Boston, particularly in pockets of Chinatown and Dorchester. But a favorite that comes up again and again is in Allston, at Pho Viet’s in the Super 88 food court. The Vietnamese sandwich includes lemongrass-marinated, grilled pork and plenty of fresh and pickled vegetables, served on a long bun that’s crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. "The sharp and sugary marinade caramelizes deeply on the grill, offering a depth of flavor that cuts through the soy- and fish-sauce-based dressing that finishes off every sandwich," writes Kenji Alt in a 2007 review in The Phoenix. The best part? It’s less than $4. [Photo: Yelp/Yuka Y.]
1095 Commonwealth Ave
Boston, MA 02228

13. Legal Sea Foods-Park Square

26 Park Plz, Boston, MA 02116
New England Clam Chowder: In general, clam chowder would have to be considered an iconic dish for Boston, and anecdotally speaking, it’s probably a top item on the Boston food bucket list of most tourists. Chowder is ubiquitous around here, and great versions aren’t too hard to find, so which restaurant’s offering should be deemed the most iconic of them all? Well, Legal Sea Foods lays claim to serving clam chowder at every presidential inauguration from Ronald Reagan through Barack Obama, so there’s that. [Photo: Facebook]
26 Park Plz
Boston, MA 02116

14. Jacob Wirth

31-37 Stuart St, Boston, MA 02116
Wiener Schnitzel: Jacob Wirth has been open in the Theatre District since way back in 1868, serving German food in a city that doesn’t currently have much in the way of German food. The wiener schnitzel entree is a classic preparation of breaded veal tenderloin with spaetzle, also available as an appetizer or in a sandwich. [Photo: Official Site]
31-37 Stuart St
Boston, MA 02116

15. Dumpling Cafe

695 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111
Mini Juicy Buns: Boston doesn’t have a huge number of restaurants that serve xiao long bao, also known as soup dumplings - Chinese steamed buns filled with broth and generally pork or a mix of pork and crabmeat. Both combinations are available at Dumpling Cafe in Chinatown, which calls them "mini juicy buns" on the menu, and it’s one of the best places in town to get them. The skin of a soup dumpling is the most essential piece of the equation; too thin, and you’ll get scalding broth leakage, but too thick, and the dough-to-filling ratio will just be off. Here, it’s just right. In a 2011 Serious Eats post, J. Kenzi López-Alt describes the dumplings as having "skins that are tender and pliant with just enough chew, thin, but not so thin that they risk breaking and spilling precious soup before they get to your mouth." [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]
695 Washington St
Boston, MA 02111

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16. Peach Farm

4 Tyler St, Boston, MA 02111
Lobster with Ginger and Scallions: A favorite late-night industry haunt in Chinatown, Peach Farm is "Boston’s ground zero for live-tank eating," writes Boston Magazine’s Jolyon Helterman. The must-try dish is the lobster with ginger and scallions, giant hunks of juicy meat tossed in a flavorful sauce. [Photo: Foursquare/Yeein L.]
4 Tyler St
Boston, MA 02111

17. China King

60 Beach St, Boston, MA 02111
Peking Duck: The owners of the defunct King Fung Garden opened China King in 2012, and the Chinatown restaurant has quickly earned a reputation for its Peking duck feast, which feeds three or four people for around $40 and must be ordered a day in advance. After servers present the whole duck to the table, it goes back into the kitchen and comes out in three courses (skin with pancakes, a stir-fry, and then a noodle soup). "The crisp skin shatters in your mouth releasing a layer of rich, creamy duck fat," writes the Boston Globe’s Catherine Smart in a 2012 review. The stir-fry is "simple and delicious," while the soup is "flavorful" and "light." For The Phoenix (RIP), MC Slim JB reviewed the restaurant in 2012, describing the Peking Duck as "easily one of the best and most delicious deals in Chinatown, if not the city: a luxurious but budget-friendly feast." [Photo: Foursquare/Jeff G.]
60 Beach St
Boston, MA 02111

18. Fenway Park

4 Yawkey Way, Boston, MA 02215
Fenway Frank: While the concessions at Fenway Park - or any baseball stadium, really - tend to lean on the "I’m paying WHAT for a tiny beer?!" side, the Fenway Frank claims a spot in this iconic meat group because it’s a symbol of Boston pride, childhood outings with the family, and hot summer nights under bright stadium lights. The Fenway Frank, a beef dog, is currently made by Kayem (and can be purchased in packs of eight at most supermarkets). The company describes the flavor as "a touch of smoke and garlic," and they’re traditionally served steamed on a New England-style bun (split on top) with mustard, relish, and onion. [Photo: Official Site]
4 Yawkey Way
Boston, MA 02215

19. Hamersley's Bistro

553 Tremont St, Boston, MA 02116
Roast Chicken with Garlic, Lemon, and Parsley: Hamersley’s Bistro opened in the South End in 1987, moving to a larger space nearby - its current home - in 1993. Chef-owner Gordon Hamersley has received many accolades over the years, including a James Beard Award, for his French bistro cuisine, which he started serving in Boston long before the local rise of the upscale French bistro. His signature roast chicken, created back in the early days with his then-sous chef Jody Adams (Rialto, Trade), is well-loved. It’s currently made with Giannone free-range birds from Quebec, a popular choice amongst high-end restaurants around town. The chicken comes out moist with perfectly crispy skin thanks to the last step in the cooking process - the carved chicken is returned to its pan, which is still full of cooking liquids, and then broiled. Take a look at this 1992 episode of Julia Child’s "In Julia’s Kitchen with Master Chefs," which features the dish. [Photo: Yelp/Berk O.]
553 Tremont St
Boston, MA 02116

20. Sullivan's

2080 Day Blvd, Boston, MA 02127
Hot Dog: Sullivan’s has been a Castle Island staple since 1951, and its seasonal opening is always one of the first signs of warm days ahead. (Generally, it’s open from late February through late November, with longer hours and lines in the summer.) While the takeout spot is known for the hot dogs, it also offers burgers, fried seafood, ice cream, and the like. The dogs, which cost a mere 15 cents back in the early days, have climbed up to $1.80, although they’re available for half the price during customer appreciation events, like opening weekend. They’re made by Kayem and served on buns that are "tossed naked onto a large flat toaster for just the right toasty-smooshed goodness." Sullivan’s has some ordering lingo to keep in mind; order your hot dog "all around," for example, to get it topped with mustard, relish, and onion. [Photo: Rachel Leah Blumenthal]
2080 Day Blvd
Boston, MA 02127

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