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A grill is packed with various meats and topped with green vegetables.
Gopchang Story.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

The Hottest New Restaurants in Boston, August 2022

New restaurants to try in and around Boston, featuring offal-focused Korean barbecue, creative pitas, southwest Chinese dishes, and more

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Gopchang Story.
| Adam Moussa/Eater NY

More often than not, friends, family, and readers of Eater have a single burning question: Where should I eat right now? The Eater Heatmap, updated monthly, is where restaurant obsessives can find what's new and exciting in Greater Boston — where to get the latest grilled lobster, lamb-stuffed pitas, leche de tigre, and more. (Looking for a drink? Check out the Eater Cocktail Heatmap.)

New to the map in the August 2022 update: Gopchang Story near Boston University, the new Haven location in Jamaica Plain, and Mecha Noodle Bar in Brookline.

To see restaurants from past versions of the Heatmap, visit the archive.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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La Royal

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The team behind Somerville’s acclaimed Peruvian restaurant Celeste is at it again: Maria Rondeau and JuanMa Calderón have opened La Royal in Cambridge, and with twice the capacity and three times the space, they’re digging deep into food from all around Peru, a contrast to the Lima home cooking Celeste highlights. There’s patarshca, a grilled and steamed whole fish dish from the Amazon, for example, and arroz con pato, rice with duck, from northern Peru. The cocktail list features plenty of pisco.

A whole grilled and steamed fish is presented on a plantain leaf and surrounded by yucca pieces and lime wedges.
La Royal’s take on patarashca, a dish from the Amazon, features local black sea bass that is grilled and steamed in plantain leaves and served with Amazonic condiments.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Bosso Ramen Tavern

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A full-service izakaya inspired by owner Yasu Sasago’s youth spent surfing the long waves that swell along Japan’s Boso peninsula, Bosso Ramen Tavern invites diners to linger in the long, cozy dining room where food heavy in skill and creativity shines in a serene space that doesn’t distract from it. Piping hot bowls of ramen, playful sushi like one topped with takoyaki balls, seafood such as kikumasamune steamed clams, and a black sesame ice cream with sweet potato for the finale all make this restaurant stand out among the area’s plethora of Japanese restaurants.

The Dubliner

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The Dubliner is an Irish restaurant, but don’t expect the type of menu you’d see at Boston’s countless old-school Irish pubs. Chef and co-owner Aidan Mc Gee, who hails from Ireland’s county Donegal and has worked at Michelin-starred restaurants in Great Britain, aims to serve what people are eating in Ireland today. It’s a cuisine rich in fresh, local vegetables and proteins, he says, with minimalist preparations that draw inspiration from Scandinavia. On the opening menu: pearled barley dumplings Mc Gee calls “Irish arancini,” a “pubby” dish of smoked ham-hock terrine, a “perfect pour” of Guinness, and seasonal soft serve.

A smoked ham terrine served with apple puree and a celeriac and apple slaw.
The Dubliner’s slow-cooked smoked ham-hock terrine.
Nathan Tavares/Eater

High Street Place

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High Street Place is Boston’s newest food hall. The massive downtown destination features 19 food and beverage vendors (and a convenience store), including three new businesses from restaurateur Tiffani Faison; new locations of local favorites like Pennypacker’s, Mike & Patty’s, and Wheelhouse; and other familiar faces. Customers can carry food and drink from any of the vendors throughout the space, so friends could share a feast of pizza, a seafood tower, fried chicken sandwiches, Champagne, Japanese whisky, frozen margaritas, gelato, and much, much more.

An interior view of a three-and-a-half story atrium with communal seating and a variety of food and beverage vendors. There’s also a green wall and a large video screen.
High Street Place.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Gopchang Story

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Korean barbecue chain Gopchang Story has finally arrived in Boston, several years after the expansion was announced. It’s a love letter to offal, particularly cow intestines, which are served in a variety of ways, including marinated and grilled or in a casserole with shrimp, octopus, and vegetables. The restaurant’s drink list emphasizes the Korean spirit soju.

A grill is packed with various meats and topped with green vegetables.
Gopchang Story.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

It’s pitas galore — not to mention whole roasted cauliflower and a “run over potato” — at this casual Israeli street food chain, an import from Tel Aviv with a wildly popular New York location. Miznon’s location in Boston’s Seaport District debuted in April and is already attracting crowds feasting on creatively stuffed pitas, such as the “folded cheeseburger,” steak and eggs, and wild mushrooms. Vegetarians will find quite a few options on the menu.

A pita wrapped in white paper stands on a tabletop stuffed with a burger patty, pickle, tomato, and crispy cheese.
Cheeseburger in a pita at Miznon.
Miznon

Blue Ribbon Sushi

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Blue Ribbon Sushi is New York-based hospitality group Blue Ribbon Restaurants’ first foray into Boston — with two more restaurants planned for the same building in Kenmore Square. While the group is new to Boston, Blue Ribbon Sushi is an acclaimed classic in New York, where the first location opened back in 1995 before expanding elsewhere in the city (and to other cities). There’s omakase, starting at $145 per person, and an expansive a la carte selection highlighting seafood from New England, Japan, and beyond. The sea scallop skewer with miso butter is an early hit.

Three seared scallops sit in a creamy pool of pale yellow sauce in a decorative black bowl.
Blue Ribbon Sushi’s yaki sea scallop skewer with miso butter.
Blue Ribbon Sushi

Faccia Brutta

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Fans of Boston classics Toro and Coppa (and their younger sibling in Cambridge, Little Donkey) have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the newest installment from restaurateurs Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette, and now it’s here. Faccia Brutta — Italian for “ugly face” — opened in May in a prime Newbury Street location, drawing inspiration from coastal Italian cuisines with dishes like pansotti, a filled Ligurian pasta, with brown butter and fiddleheads; a grilled half lobster with clams, fregola, and chile butter; and a generous selection of crudos. A sibling spot downstairs, Bar Pallino, focuses on natural wines.

Overhead view of a half lobster sitting in a small pool of reddish broth and topped with small, round dots of pasta, herbs, and small clams.
Faccia Brutta’s grilled, chile-basted half lobster.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Bab Al Yemen

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A new Fenway restaurant is addressing Boston’s lack of Yemeni dining options with hearty dishes like lamb haneeth, a slow-roasted and spiced lamb with rice — a favorite among early visitors — served in a warm ambience. Also on the menu: mushakal hkuthar, a vegetable stew with fresh bread; moffa fish, a baked fish special available on weekdays; non-alcoholic malt beverages Lazziza and Barbican; and lots more.

Mecha Noodle Bar

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Korean fried chicken bao, ramen, and pho — not to mention boozy bubble teas — are on the menu at Mecha Noodle Bar, a small Connecticut-based chain that recently arrived in Brookline’s Coolidge Corner and aims to serve “some of Asia’s most comforting dishes.” (Watch for a Fort Point location to open later this year, too.) Early visitors are loving the well-designed space, friendly service, and flavorful food at the restaurant, which also has a charitable arm, donating a portion of ramen sales to a rotating list of local causes, among other philanthropic initiatives.

Bowls of ramen, pho, and edamame are spread across a wooden restaurant table alongside colorful cocktails.
A spread of dishes at Mecha Noodle Bar, now open in Brookline and coming soon to Boston’s Fort Point.
Mecha Noodle Bar

Yunnan Kitchen

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In Boston’s South End, Yunnan Kitchen is featuring Yunnan, or Dian, cuisine from southwest China, fairly hard to find around Boston aside from a handful of Yunnan rice noodle-focused shops, including Yunnan Kitchen’s older sibling South of the Clouds in Brighton. Yunnan Kitchen is emphasizing spicy dishes and a more expansive menu than noodles, says co-founder Patrick Siu. The initial opening lineup includes dishes such as Dali-style spicy shrimp (Dali is a city in China’s Yunnan province), sticky rice meatballs, boiled pork in chile oil, and fish filet with pickled vegetables.

The Haven

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The Haven — Boston’s only Scottish restaurant and bar — has been open for a dozen years, but it recently bid adieu to its Perkins Street space and moved elsewhere in Jamaica Plain, opening in the much larger former Bella Luna & the Milky Way space at the Brewery complex. Much of its old menu (and charm) remains, but now there’s pizza, too, and the events calendar is quickly ramping up: Expect dram nights, comedy shows, and lots more in the coming weeks.

La Royal

A whole grilled and steamed fish is presented on a plantain leaf and surrounded by yucca pieces and lime wedges.
La Royal’s take on patarashca, a dish from the Amazon, features local black sea bass that is grilled and steamed in plantain leaves and served with Amazonic condiments.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The team behind Somerville’s acclaimed Peruvian restaurant Celeste is at it again: Maria Rondeau and JuanMa Calderón have opened La Royal in Cambridge, and with twice the capacity and three times the space, they’re digging deep into food from all around Peru, a contrast to the Lima home cooking Celeste highlights. There’s patarshca, a grilled and steamed whole fish dish from the Amazon, for example, and arroz con pato, rice with duck, from northern Peru. The cocktail list features plenty of pisco.

A whole grilled and steamed fish is presented on a plantain leaf and surrounded by yucca pieces and lime wedges.
La Royal’s take on patarashca, a dish from the Amazon, features local black sea bass that is grilled and steamed in plantain leaves and served with Amazonic condiments.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Bosso Ramen Tavern

A full-service izakaya inspired by owner Yasu Sasago’s youth spent surfing the long waves that swell along Japan’s Boso peninsula, Bosso Ramen Tavern invites diners to linger in the long, cozy dining room where food heavy in skill and creativity shines in a serene space that doesn’t distract from it. Piping hot bowls of ramen, playful sushi like one topped with takoyaki balls, seafood such as kikumasamune steamed clams, and a black sesame ice cream with sweet potato for the finale all make this restaurant stand out among the area’s plethora of Japanese restaurants.

The Dubliner

A smoked ham terrine served with apple puree and a celeriac and apple slaw.
The Dubliner’s slow-cooked smoked ham-hock terrine.
Nathan Tavares/Eater

The Dubliner is an Irish restaurant, but don’t expect the type of menu you’d see at Boston’s countless old-school Irish pubs. Chef and co-owner Aidan Mc Gee, who hails from Ireland’s county Donegal and has worked at Michelin-starred restaurants in Great Britain, aims to serve what people are eating in Ireland today. It’s a cuisine rich in fresh, local vegetables and proteins, he says, with minimalist preparations that draw inspiration from Scandinavia. On the opening menu: pearled barley dumplings Mc Gee calls “Irish arancini,” a “pubby” dish of smoked ham-hock terrine, a “perfect pour” of Guinness, and seasonal soft serve.

A smoked ham terrine served with apple puree and a celeriac and apple slaw.
The Dubliner’s slow-cooked smoked ham-hock terrine.
Nathan Tavares/Eater

High Street Place

An interior view of a three-and-a-half story atrium with communal seating and a variety of food and beverage vendors. There’s also a green wall and a large video screen.
High Street Place.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

High Street Place is Boston’s newest food hall. The massive downtown destination features 19 food and beverage vendors (and a convenience store), including three new businesses from restaurateur Tiffani Faison; new locations of local favorites like Pennypacker’s, Mike & Patty’s, and Wheelhouse; and other familiar faces. Customers can carry food and drink from any of the vendors throughout the space, so friends could share a feast of pizza, a seafood tower, fried chicken sandwiches, Champagne, Japanese whisky, frozen margaritas, gelato, and much, much more.

An interior view of a three-and-a-half story atrium with communal seating and a variety of food and beverage vendors. There’s also a green wall and a large video screen.
High Street Place.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Gopchang Story

A grill is packed with various meats and topped with green vegetables.
Gopchang Story.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

Korean barbecue chain Gopchang Story has finally arrived in Boston, several years after the expansion was announced. It’s a love letter to offal, particularly cow intestines, which are served in a variety of ways, including marinated and grilled or in a casserole with shrimp, octopus, and vegetables. The restaurant’s drink list emphasizes the Korean spirit soju.

A grill is packed with various meats and topped with green vegetables.
Gopchang Story.
Adam Moussa/Eater NY

Miznon

A pita wrapped in white paper stands on a tabletop stuffed with a burger patty, pickle, tomato, and crispy cheese.
Cheeseburger in a pita at Miznon.
Miznon

It’s pitas galore — not to mention whole roasted cauliflower and a “run over potato” — at this casual Israeli street food chain, an import from Tel Aviv with a wildly popular New York location. Miznon’s location in Boston’s Seaport District debuted in April and is already attracting crowds feasting on creatively stuffed pitas, such as the “folded cheeseburger,” steak and eggs, and wild mushrooms. Vegetarians will find quite a few options on the menu.

A pita wrapped in white paper stands on a tabletop stuffed with a burger patty, pickle, tomato, and crispy cheese.
Cheeseburger in a pita at Miznon.
Miznon

Blue Ribbon Sushi

Three seared scallops sit in a creamy pool of pale yellow sauce in a decorative black bowl.
Blue Ribbon Sushi’s yaki sea scallop skewer with miso butter.
Blue Ribbon Sushi

Blue Ribbon Sushi is New York-based hospitality group Blue Ribbon Restaurants’ first foray into Boston — with two more restaurants planned for the same building in Kenmore Square. While the group is new to Boston, Blue Ribbon Sushi is an acclaimed classic in New York, where the first location opened back in 1995 before expanding elsewhere in the city (and to other cities). There’s omakase, starting at $145 per person, and an expansive a la carte selection highlighting seafood from New England, Japan, and beyond. The sea scallop skewer with miso butter is an early hit.

Three seared scallops sit in a creamy pool of pale yellow sauce in a decorative black bowl.
Blue Ribbon Sushi’s yaki sea scallop skewer with miso butter.
Blue Ribbon Sushi

Faccia Brutta

Overhead view of a half lobster sitting in a small pool of reddish broth and topped with small, round dots of pasta, herbs, and small clams.
Faccia Brutta’s grilled, chile-basted half lobster.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Fans of Boston classics Toro and Coppa (and their younger sibling in Cambridge, Little Donkey) have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the newest installment from restaurateurs Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette, and now it’s here. Faccia Brutta — Italian for “ugly face” — opened in May in a prime Newbury Street location, drawing inspiration from coastal Italian cuisines with dishes like pansotti, a filled Ligurian pasta, with brown butter and fiddleheads; a grilled half lobster with clams, fregola, and chile butter; and a generous selection of crudos. A sibling spot downstairs, Bar Pallino, focuses on natural wines.

Overhead view of a half lobster sitting in a small pool of reddish broth and topped with small, round dots of pasta, herbs, and small clams.
Faccia Brutta’s grilled, chile-basted half lobster.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Bab Al Yemen

A new Fenway restaurant is addressing Boston’s lack of Yemeni dining options with hearty dishes like lamb haneeth, a slow-roasted and spiced lamb with rice — a favorite among early visitors — served in a warm ambience. Also on the menu: mushakal hkuthar, a vegetable stew with fresh bread; moffa fish, a baked fish special available on weekdays; non-alcoholic malt beverages Lazziza and Barbican; and lots more.

Mecha Noodle Bar

Bowls of ramen, pho, and edamame are spread across a wooden restaurant table alongside colorful cocktails.
A spread of dishes at Mecha Noodle Bar, now open in Brookline and coming soon to Boston’s Fort Point.
Mecha Noodle Bar

Korean fried chicken bao, ramen, and pho — not to mention boozy bubble teas — are on the menu at Mecha Noodle Bar, a small Connecticut-based chain that recently arrived in Brookline’s Coolidge Corner and aims to serve “some of Asia’s most comforting dishes.” (Watch for a Fort Point location to open later this year, too.) Early visitors are loving the well-designed space, friendly service, and flavorful food at the restaurant, which also has a charitable arm, donating a portion of ramen sales to a rotating list of local causes, among other philanthropic initiatives.

Bowls of ramen, pho, and edamame are spread across a wooden restaurant table alongside colorful cocktails.
A spread of dishes at Mecha Noodle Bar, now open in Brookline and coming soon to Boston’s Fort Point.
Mecha Noodle Bar

Yunnan Kitchen

In Boston’s South End, Yunnan Kitchen is featuring Yunnan, or Dian, cuisine from southwest China, fairly hard to find around Boston aside from a handful of Yunnan rice noodle-focused shops, including Yunnan Kitchen’s older sibling South of the Clouds in Brighton. Yunnan Kitchen is emphasizing spicy dishes and a more expansive menu than noodles, says co-founder Patrick Siu. The initial opening lineup includes dishes such as Dali-style spicy shrimp (Dali is a city in China’s Yunnan province), sticky rice meatballs, boiled pork in chile oil, and fish filet with pickled vegetables.

The Haven

The Haven — Boston’s only Scottish restaurant and bar — has been open for a dozen years, but it recently bid adieu to its Perkins Street space and moved elsewhere in Jamaica Plain, opening in the much larger former Bella Luna & the Milky Way space at the Brewery complex. Much of its old menu (and charm) remains, but now there’s pizza, too, and the events calendar is quickly ramping up: Expect dram nights, comedy shows, and lots more in the coming weeks.

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