clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A close-up photo of a noodle soup with slices of beef and vegetables in a brown broth.
The Lanzhou beef noodle soup at Lanner Noodles and Bar.
Lanner Noodles and Bar

The Hottest New Restaurants in Boston Right Now

Looking for a new place to check out tonight? Start here

View as Map
The Lanzhou beef noodle soup at Lanner Noodles and Bar.
| Lanner Noodles and Bar

More often than not, friends, family, and readers of Eater have a single burning question: Where should I eat right now? The Eater Boston Heatmap, updated monthly, is where restaurant obsessives can find what's new and exciting around the city. (Looking for a drink? Check out the Eater Boston Cocktail Heatmap.)

New to the map in the February 2024 update: Lanner Noodles and Bar, a stylish Chinese noodle shop, swings open its doors in Central Square.

For all the latest Boston dining intel, subscribe to Eater Boston's newsletter.

Read More
Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

The Eaves

Copy Link

What’re you bound to hear when eavesdropping at Eaves, which officially debuted in Somerville’s Bow Market in September? Rave reviews about the soul-warming congee with micro shrimp. Or the cozy vermicelli soup with fish broth that’s topped with crispy fish and herbs. And don’t forget the grilled duck. While the small plates at this Vietnam-meets-New-England restaurant helmed by chef Vincenzo Le and Duong Huynh (of Cicada Coffee Bar) change on a whim, what’s constant are flavors you’ll want to blab about.

An overhead shot of a bowl of white porridge topped with brown micro shrimp and green garnishes.
A congee made with micro shrimp and a bluefish broth at the Eaves.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Wade BBQ

Copy Link

Boston native David Wade is aiming to shake up Boston’s barbecue scene by pioneering “Boston-style” barbecue with big flavors, as the chef and owner recently described it to the Boston Globe. The takeout counter sells cuts like smoked sausage, crispy pork belly burnt ends, and tender, fatty smoked brisket (plus a vegetarian-friendly portabella “pulled pork”). The proteins come stuffed into sandwiches and sold in combo plates with juiced-up side staples like coleslaw brightened with lime juice and turkey collard greens.

A white styrofoam takeout container lined with black and white checkered paper and filled with food.
A Wade BBQ combo plate with brisket, turkey collard greens, and mac and cheese.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

June Bug

Copy Link

Andrew Brady and Sara Markey, the proprietors behind date-night favorite Field & Vine, are now up-leveling pizza night at June Bug. The quirky, colorful new spot, located just around the corner from Field & Vine, features a massive, wood-fired pizza oven that turns out puffy, delicious Neapolitan-style pies. Well-dressed salads and fun raw seafood dishes like the bluefin tuna crudo with pepperoni pecans fill out the menu. Wash it all down with natural wines, cocktails, and an excellent selection of New England craft beers.

A pizza with a blistered crust positioned on top of a tomato can.
The Shuggie’s pizza, with tomato, mozzarella, basil schug, and pecorino cheese
Leonard Greco/June Bug

Lanner Noodles & Bar

Copy Link

Hand-pulled noodles are the ticket at Lanner, and you can find them in several forms, including cozy tomato-and-egg noodles and a rich Lanzhou beef noodle soup — a soul-satisfying dish that is close to co-owner Sean Xiao’s heart. Round out the meal with plates of sticky sweet and sour spareribs, barbecued lamb skewers, and bites of pepper chicken spiked with Sichuan peppercorns.

A table filled with small plates of barbecued meat skewers, sweet and sour short ribs, tomato and egg noodles, and more.
A spread of dishes at Lanner Noodles and Bar.
Lanner Noodles and Bar

Hook + Line

Copy Link

This is a New England seafood restaurant in a town already well-familiar with the concept, but, under the guidance of owner Tom Schlesinger-Guidelli and chef Mark Cina, Hook + Line hits creative high notes. Grilled Kayem hot dogs share space on the menu with showstopping entrees like the whole roasted branzino, smothered in a subtly zingy Calabrian chile crisp and sprinkled with crunchy bits of hazelnuts. Pair any dish with a glass from Schlesinger-Guidelli’s expertly curated wine list.

A whole fish splayed out on a white serving platter with a charred half of lemon on the side.
The whole roasted branzino smothered in Calabrian chile crisp and sprinkled with hazelnuts.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Szechuan Mountain House

Copy Link

This fan-favorite Sichuan restaurant got its start a decade ago in New York City’s East Village. Years later, it’s a transcontinental hit: The restaurant has two locations in New York, a Los Angeles spot, and, as of this fall, a new outpost in Boston’s Allston neighborhood. The photogenic swing pork belly dish is a staple starter; from there, the menu sings with meat, seafood, and vegetables that are painstakingly braised and marinated in the tingly, complex peppercorn sauces and chilis that the region is famous for.

Thinly sliced strips of pork belly and cucumber hang on a small wooden pole propped up over a dish of garlic sauce.
Szechuan Mountain House’s signature swing pork belly dish.
Bob Zhang/Szechuan Mountain House

Somenya

Copy Link

Hearty bowls of buckwheat noodles are drawing diners in at Japanese soba shop Somenya, one of Chinatown’s newest restaurant players. The noodles are served either in a hot broth or chilled with decadent seafood toppings, including ikura (salmon) caviar and uni. The comforting bowls are an excellent respite from Boston’s long, dark winter months.

An overhead photo of a wide bowl filled with beef, noodles, kimchi, mushrooms, a soft-boiled egg, and green scallion pieces.
Kimchi beef soba at Somenya.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Moon Bar

Copy Link

Under chef Carl Dooley, Mooncusser has quickly established itself as one of the city’s go-to spots for an inventive tasting menu that is worth the splurge. At Moon Bar, a more casual weeknight hangout located below the second-floor fine dining spot, Dooley hands the reins to chef Nelson Whittingham to oversee a menu that preserves the spirit of Mooncusser without the white tablecloths. Don’t miss the sweet potato samosas dipped in tamarind chutney and the red snapper and crab stew, and pair it all with a couple of cocktails from Uni alum Jake Smith, who is leading the bar program.

Sandwiches, salads, and oysters laid out on a table with glasses of wine and cocktails interspersed between the plates.
A spread of dishes at Moon Bar.
Brian Samuels/Moon Bar

Sabina Mezcaleria

Copy Link

Sabina Mezcaleria — from the same folks behind next-door taco shop La Neta and longstanding Mexican restaurant El Centro in the South End — boasts an expansive mezcal list that is, of course, the main draw, but the accompanying food menu, highlighting ingredients lesser-seen in Boston’s Mexican restaurant scene, is also worth seeking out. Order empanadas oozing with cheese and smoky huitlacoche, guacamole topped with chipotle-roasted grasshoppers, and bright ceviches served with saucer-sized taro chips.

A square serving of roasted pork with a crispy top plated over a smear of yellow sauce on a circular plate.
Sabina’s cuadrito de lechon, which, as the name implies, is a very tasty little square cut of roasted pork.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

With a name that means “love” in Portuguese, it’s no surprise that there’s lots to love at Amar, the modern Portuguese restaurant by Michelin-starred chef (and recent Boston transplant) George Mendes. Here, seafood-heavy fare celebrates and reinvents classic Portuguese dishes, like bacalhau à Gomes de Sá, with a zing from dehydrated black olives. Unexpected, though, are sublime desserts, like brûléed lime and vanilla-scented rice pudding. The made-to-order pão de ló sponge cake with sheep’s milk yogurt sorbet is enough to write love sonnets to.

A rectangular cube of milk bread topped with uni, shiso, and little edible flowers.
Toasted milk bread topped with uni at Amar.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Blue Ribbon Brasserie

Copy Link

Blue Ribbon, which got its start as a late-night industry favorite in New York City, is looking to duplicate the success in Boston inside the former home of another late-night industry favorite, Eastern Standard (which has also returned; more on that below). Blue Ribbon’s ranging menu includes pate, paella, pierogies, and a pupu platter that involves tableside roasting, plus brasserie staples like steak frites, oysters, and French onion soup with melty gruyère cheese.

A white shallow bowl filled with roasted shrimp and pasta and garnished with green spinach.
Shrimp provencal with cheese ravioli and spinach.
Blue Ribbon Brasserie

Eastern Standard Kitchen and Drinks

Copy Link

Boston was hit hard by the loss of industry favorite Eastern Standard during the pandemic. The subsequent comeback story is particularly sweet: Restaurateur Garrett Harker and his team of hospitality all-stars re-opened the brasserie in October at the Bower complex in Fenway, resuscitating the restaurant legend with dishes like the steak frites, the roasted half-chicken, and the baked rigatoni.

A bar room filled with customers sitting at a long bar with tables and chairs visible behind them in the dining room. Eastern Standard

D.W. French

Copy Link

You may be most familiar with chef Douglass Williams as the force behind Mida, Boston’s excellent Italian restaurant dishing out cheesy focaccia, pizza, and plates of creamy gnocchi cacio e pepe at locations in the South End, Newton, and East Boston. At D.W. French, the chef has built an ode to French food and culture, nodding to a core part of his culinary training. The Fenway brasserie is a glamorous stop for garlicky escargot, beef bourguignon sandwiches, steak and tuna tartare, and regional cheese and charcuterie boards.

A sub sandwich filled with beef and a white sauce sits on a white plate with a stark blue background visible.
D.W. French’s beef bourguignon sandwich.
Kan Photography/D.W. French

311 Omakase

Copy Link

You probably need an excuse for a a splurge-y night out. Luckily, the 18-course chef-curated meals at this new beauty in a South End brownstone lean on the luxe side. While the menu changes often, past courses have included salmon roe and amberjack fish tucked into a mochi rice cracker shell, plus Hokkaido hairy crab served with uni and caviar, and a palate cleanser of miso soup with a rich anchovy broth. And the 411 on 311: The restaurant offers two services for ten people every night, excluding Tuesdays. And hey, at $250 per person, it’s still cheaper than a flight to Japan, where co-owners Carrie Ko and chef Wei Fa Chen source most of their seafood.

A closeup shot of a floral-shaped cracker filled with orange salmon row, topped with flowers.
An appetizer at 311 Omakase, featuring a mochi rice cracker filled with salmon roe and amberjack fish.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

The Eaves

What’re you bound to hear when eavesdropping at Eaves, which officially debuted in Somerville’s Bow Market in September? Rave reviews about the soul-warming congee with micro shrimp. Or the cozy vermicelli soup with fish broth that’s topped with crispy fish and herbs. And don’t forget the grilled duck. While the small plates at this Vietnam-meets-New-England restaurant helmed by chef Vincenzo Le and Duong Huynh (of Cicada Coffee Bar) change on a whim, what’s constant are flavors you’ll want to blab about.

An overhead shot of a bowl of white porridge topped with brown micro shrimp and green garnishes.
A congee made with micro shrimp and a bluefish broth at the Eaves.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Wade BBQ

Boston native David Wade is aiming to shake up Boston’s barbecue scene by pioneering “Boston-style” barbecue with big flavors, as the chef and owner recently described it to the Boston Globe. The takeout counter sells cuts like smoked sausage, crispy pork belly burnt ends, and tender, fatty smoked brisket (plus a vegetarian-friendly portabella “pulled pork”). The proteins come stuffed into sandwiches and sold in combo plates with juiced-up side staples like coleslaw brightened with lime juice and turkey collard greens.

A white styrofoam takeout container lined with black and white checkered paper and filled with food.
A Wade BBQ combo plate with brisket, turkey collard greens, and mac and cheese.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

June Bug

Andrew Brady and Sara Markey, the proprietors behind date-night favorite Field & Vine, are now up-leveling pizza night at June Bug. The quirky, colorful new spot, located just around the corner from Field & Vine, features a massive, wood-fired pizza oven that turns out puffy, delicious Neapolitan-style pies. Well-dressed salads and fun raw seafood dishes like the bluefin tuna crudo with pepperoni pecans fill out the menu. Wash it all down with natural wines, cocktails, and an excellent selection of New England craft beers.

A pizza with a blistered crust positioned on top of a tomato can.
The Shuggie’s pizza, with tomato, mozzarella, basil schug, and pecorino cheese
Leonard Greco/June Bug

Lanner Noodles & Bar

Hand-pulled noodles are the ticket at Lanner, and you can find them in several forms, including cozy tomato-and-egg noodles and a rich Lanzhou beef noodle soup — a soul-satisfying dish that is close to co-owner Sean Xiao’s heart. Round out the meal with plates of sticky sweet and sour spareribs, barbecued lamb skewers, and bites of pepper chicken spiked with Sichuan peppercorns.

A table filled with small plates of barbecued meat skewers, sweet and sour short ribs, tomato and egg noodles, and more.
A spread of dishes at Lanner Noodles and Bar.
Lanner Noodles and Bar

Hook + Line

This is a New England seafood restaurant in a town already well-familiar with the concept, but, under the guidance of owner Tom Schlesinger-Guidelli and chef Mark Cina, Hook + Line hits creative high notes. Grilled Kayem hot dogs share space on the menu with showstopping entrees like the whole roasted branzino, smothered in a subtly zingy Calabrian chile crisp and sprinkled with crunchy bits of hazelnuts. Pair any dish with a glass from Schlesinger-Guidelli’s expertly curated wine list.

A whole fish splayed out on a white serving platter with a charred half of lemon on the side.
The whole roasted branzino smothered in Calabrian chile crisp and sprinkled with hazelnuts.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Szechuan Mountain House

This fan-favorite Sichuan restaurant got its start a decade ago in New York City’s East Village. Years later, it’s a transcontinental hit: The restaurant has two locations in New York, a Los Angeles spot, and, as of this fall, a new outpost in Boston’s Allston neighborhood. The photogenic swing pork belly dish is a staple starter; from there, the menu sings with meat, seafood, and vegetables that are painstakingly braised and marinated in the tingly, complex peppercorn sauces and chilis that the region is famous for.

Thinly sliced strips of pork belly and cucumber hang on a small wooden pole propped up over a dish of garlic sauce.
Szechuan Mountain House’s signature swing pork belly dish.
Bob Zhang/Szechuan Mountain House

Somenya

Hearty bowls of buckwheat noodles are drawing diners in at Japanese soba shop Somenya, one of Chinatown’s newest restaurant players. The noodles are served either in a hot broth or chilled with decadent seafood toppings, including ikura (salmon) caviar and uni. The comforting bowls are an excellent respite from Boston’s long, dark winter months.

An overhead photo of a wide bowl filled with beef, noodles, kimchi, mushrooms, a soft-boiled egg, and green scallion pieces.
Kimchi beef soba at Somenya.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Moon Bar

Under chef Carl Dooley, Mooncusser has quickly established itself as one of the city’s go-to spots for an inventive tasting menu that is worth the splurge. At Moon Bar, a more casual weeknight hangout located below the second-floor fine dining spot, Dooley hands the reins to chef Nelson Whittingham to oversee a menu that preserves the spirit of Mooncusser without the white tablecloths. Don’t miss the sweet potato samosas dipped in tamarind chutney and the red snapper and crab stew, and pair it all with a couple of cocktails from Uni alum Jake Smith, who is leading the bar program.

Sandwiches, salads, and oysters laid out on a table with glasses of wine and cocktails interspersed between the plates.
A spread of dishes at Moon Bar.
Brian Samuels/Moon Bar

Sabina Mezcaleria

Sabina Mezcaleria — from the same folks behind next-door taco shop La Neta and longstanding Mexican restaurant El Centro in the South End — boasts an expansive mezcal list that is, of course, the main draw, but the accompanying food menu, highlighting ingredients lesser-seen in Boston’s Mexican restaurant scene, is also worth seeking out. Order empanadas oozing with cheese and smoky huitlacoche, guacamole topped with chipotle-roasted grasshoppers, and bright ceviches served with saucer-sized taro chips.

A square serving of roasted pork with a crispy top plated over a smear of yellow sauce on a circular plate.
Sabina’s cuadrito de lechon, which, as the name implies, is a very tasty little square cut of roasted pork.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Amar

With a name that means “love” in Portuguese, it’s no surprise that there’s lots to love at Amar, the modern Portuguese restaurant by Michelin-starred chef (and recent Boston transplant) George Mendes. Here, seafood-heavy fare celebrates and reinvents classic Portuguese dishes, like bacalhau à Gomes de Sá, with a zing from dehydrated black olives. Unexpected, though, are sublime desserts, like brûléed lime and vanilla-scented rice pudding. The made-to-order pão de ló sponge cake with sheep’s milk yogurt sorbet is enough to write love sonnets to.

A rectangular cube of milk bread topped with uni, shiso, and little edible flowers.
Toasted milk bread topped with uni at Amar.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Blue Ribbon Brasserie

Blue Ribbon, which got its start as a late-night industry favorite in New York City, is looking to duplicate the success in Boston inside the former home of another late-night industry favorite, Eastern Standard (which has also returned; more on that below). Blue Ribbon’s ranging menu includes pate, paella, pierogies, and a pupu platter that involves tableside roasting, plus brasserie staples like steak frites, oysters, and French onion soup with melty gruyère cheese.

A white shallow bowl filled with roasted shrimp and pasta and garnished with green spinach.
Shrimp provencal with cheese ravioli and spinach.
Blue Ribbon Brasserie

Eastern Standard Kitchen and Drinks

Boston was hit hard by the loss of industry favorite Eastern Standard during the pandemic. The subsequent comeback story is particularly sweet: Restaurateur Garrett Harker and his team of hospitality all-stars re-opened the brasserie in October at the Bower complex in Fenway, resuscitating the restaurant legend with dishes like the steak frites, the roasted half-chicken, and the baked rigatoni.

A bar room filled with customers sitting at a long bar with tables and chairs visible behind them in the dining room. Eastern Standard

D.W. French

You may be most familiar with chef Douglass Williams as the force behind Mida, Boston’s excellent Italian restaurant dishing out cheesy focaccia, pizza, and plates of creamy gnocchi cacio e pepe at locations in the South End, Newton, and East Boston. At D.W. French, the chef has built an ode to French food and culture, nodding to a core part of his culinary training. The Fenway brasserie is a glamorous stop for garlicky escargot, beef bourguignon sandwiches, steak and tuna tartare, and regional cheese and charcuterie boards.

A sub sandwich filled with beef and a white sauce sits on a white plate with a stark blue background visible.
D.W. French’s beef bourguignon sandwich.
Kan Photography/D.W. French

311 Omakase

You probably need an excuse for a a splurge-y night out. Luckily, the 18-course chef-curated meals at this new beauty in a South End brownstone lean on the luxe side. While the menu changes often, past courses have included salmon roe and amberjack fish tucked into a mochi rice cracker shell, plus Hokkaido hairy crab served with uni and caviar, and a palate cleanser of miso soup with a rich anchovy broth. And the 411 on 311: The restaurant offers two services for ten people every night, excluding Tuesdays. And hey, at $250 per person, it’s still cheaper than a flight to Japan, where co-owners Carrie Ko and chef Wei Fa Chen source most of their seafood.

A closeup shot of a floral-shaped cracker filled with orange salmon row, topped with flowers.
An appetizer at 311 Omakase, featuring a mochi rice cracker filled with salmon roe and amberjack fish.
Erika Adams/Eater Boston

Related Maps