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A zig-zag pattern of cannoli from Mike’s Pastry and Modern Pastry, arranged on a white background. Some are garnished with chocolate chips or pistachios.
Cannoli from Mike’s Pastry and Modern Pastry
Chris Coe/Eater

26 Iconic Dishes Around Boston

Get to know the city and surrounding area with these essential eats

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Cannoli from Mike’s Pastry and Modern Pastry
| Chris Coe/Eater

Attention, tourists: Boston’s dining scene hasn’t been defined by baked beans and chowder in decades. Sure, seafood is a standout option around town — in a multitude of non-chowder preparations — but there’s much more to try when eating your way around the city.

Here are 26 iconic dishes and drinks that define Boston (and the surrounding area) in one way or another, along with bonus options to try related to each one. Some of these dishes have earned a place here primarily by way of their longevity and important place in Boston’s dining history; others are truly the best of the best of their kind, regardless of age; and others are unique items that can’t be readily found anywhere else in the area.

Further reading:

The latest CDC guidance for vaccinated diners during the COVID-19 outbreak is here; dining out still carries risks for unvaccinated diners and workers. Please be aware of changing local rules, and check individual restaurant websites for any additional restrictions such as mask requirements. Find a local vaccination site here.

For all the latest Boston dining intel, subscribe to Eater Boston’s newsletter.

This map was originally published on June 27, 2017; it is updated periodically, and the date of the most recent update appears above.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Woodman’s of Essex: “Chubby’s Original” Fried Clam Plate

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121 Main St
Essex, MA 01929
(978) 768-2559 
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Nothing screams “summer in New England” like a plate of fried clams — ideally accompanied by fries and onion rings as well. And fortunately it’s not just available in the summer; this classic North Shore spot, founded more than a century ago, is open year-round. Woodman’s claims to have invented fried clams.

The restaurant separates its food counter from its drink counter, so be sure to proceed to the beverage line (there’s a full bar available) after placing your food order. There’s plenty of seating inside and out.

Other dishes to try at Woodman’s of Essex: clam cakes, clam chowder, hot boiled lobster (choose your own) with drawn butter

If you like this, also try: fried clams at J.T. Farnham’s (also in Essex), Clam Box (Ipswich), or Bob’s Clam Hut (Kittery, Maine)

Further reading: Shack Food: Casual Summer Dining in New England; Where to Eat Fried Clams in and Around Boston

A paper plate is stacked high with fried onion rings, clams, and fries, with cups of ketchup to the side, served on a cardboard tray on a red checkered tablecloth.
“Chubby’s Original” fried clam plate at Woodman’s of Essex
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

2. Kelly's Roast Beef: Roast Beef Sandwich

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410 Revere Beach Blvd
Revere, MA 02151
(781) 284-9129
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Roast beef sandwiches are practically ubiquitous in Massachusetts, particularly in the North Shore region, and there is no roast beef spot more well-known than Kelly’s Roast Beef, which opened in 1951 on Revere Beach. (These days, there are also four other locations — Saugus, Danvers, Medford, and Logan Airport.) The company even claims to have invented the roast beef sandwich in the form that it appears around the state, and mega-chain Arby’s acknowledges drawing inspiration from Kelly’s.

True North Shore roast beef fans tend to go for the “three-way” sandwich, which comes topped with James River barbecue sauce, basic Land O’Lakes white American cheese, and mayonnaise.

Other dishes to try at Kelly’s Roast Beef: lobster roll, clam chowder

If you like this, also try: roast beef 1000 at Cutty’s in Brookline, beef on weck at All Star Sandwich Bar in Cambridge, or the roast beef sandwich at Hot Box in Somerville

Further reading: How Kelly’s Roast Beef Soared From Simple Sandwich to State Icon

A roast beef sandwich with cheese, mayo, and barbecue sauce sits on a paper plate, accompanied by thick onion rings.
Roast beef sandwich at Kelly’s Roast Beef
Katie Chudy/Eater

3. Yume Wo Katare: Ramen

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1923 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA
(617) 714-4008
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Boston has no dearth of ramen options these days, but one of the most unique options in town is an eccentric little shop in Cambridge’s Porter Square where diners stand up and share their dreams after finishing massive bowls of jiro-style ramen (a hefty pork-topped style not found elsewhere in the Boston area). In non-COVID times, the menu was simple: two sizes of ramen, and each could be served with one slice of pork (kids only), two slices, or five slices. There was no takeout, aside from a 500-gram block of pork, and the shop only took cash and generally had long lines. Currently, though, it’s only open for takeout with online ordering available and a slightly larger menu.

Other dishes to try at Yume Wo Katare: As noted above, there are generally no other options. However, there are occasionally seasonal specials; keep an eye on Facebook for details. On the coldest days of winter, for instance, there may be a spicy ramen available. Or head to its sibling down the street, Yume Ga Arukara, for udon.

If you like this, also try: ramen from Ganko Ittetsu Ramen in Brookline, Pagu in Cambridge, or Pikaichi in Medford

Further reading: Warm up at These Ramen Destinations

Ramen noodles and slices of pork are stacked impossibly high in a white bowl, topped with ample garlic.
Ramen at Yume Wo Katare
Yume Wo Katare [Official Photo]

4. Bagelsaurus: T-Rex Bagel Sandwich

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1796 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA
(857) 285-6103
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Bagelsaurus started as a pop-up at Cutty’s in Brookline before opening in its own Cambridge space in late 2014. The perpetually crowded bagel spot is an Eater Boston reader favorite, snagging the win in a 2014 poll of Boston’s best bagels and winning again in a 2016 Breakfast Week poll thanks to the T-Rex bagel sandwich, stuffed with almond butter, banana, honey, and optional bacon.

Other dishes to try at Bagelsaurus: hot smoked bagel sandwich, bialy, everything bagel

If you like this, also try: bagels from Katz Bagel Bakery in Chelsea, Rosenfeld’s Bagels in Newton, Exodus in Roslindale, and Goldilox in Medford

Further reading: There's Always a Crowd at Bagelsaurus, Even on Weekdays

A hand holds a halved bagel sandwich in front of a white brick wall, showcasing the filling of almond butter, banana, honey, and bacon
T-Rex at Bagelsaurus
Bagelsaurus [Official Photo]

5. Neighborhood Restaurant: Cream of Wheat

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25 Bow St
Somerville, MA
(617) 623-9710
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Non-Somerville residents may raise a confused eyebrow to learn that one of the most iconic dishes in town is a humble bowl of Cream of Wheat, but anyone who has ever braved the line for brunch at Neighborhood — ideally on the pastel umbrella-bedecked seasonal patio — knows the truth. Every Neighborhood breakfast comes with a choice of fruit or Cream of Wheat. Don’t make the wrong choice. (Note: You can also order Cream of Wheat on its own, and it’s available for takeout as well. Let this information get you through all future Somerville winters.)

Other dishes to try at Neighborhood: anything from the specials menu, which is always jam-packed with over-the-top pancake and French toast options

If you like this, also try: other classic Somerville brunches at Supreme Kitchen and Renee’s Cafe

Further reading: Breakfast, Borges Style, at the Neighborhood Restaurant and Bakery; The Boston Breakfast and Brunch Guide

A white bowl of Cream of Wheat sits on a dark background, topped with a generous sprinkling of cinnamon
Cream of Wheat at Neighborhood
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

6. Union Square Donuts: Maple Bacon Doughnut

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20 Bow St
Somerville, MA
(617) 209-2257
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Union Square Donuts has expanded beyond its Somerville home, now with satellite locations in Brookline, at the Boston Public Market, and at Time Out Market Boston, not to mention distribution of doughnut holes to various area businesses. But the growing company hasn’t lost its focus and still knows how to please fans and draw long lines, particularly on weekends. A mainstay on the menu since day one, the maple bacon doughnut delicately toes the line between sweet and savory, making it the ideal brunch treat.

Other dishes to try at Union Square Donuts: brown butter hazelnut crunch doughnut, orange creamsicle doughnut, sea salted bourbon caramel doughnut

If you like this, also try: doughnuts at Blackbird Doughnuts (multiple locations around Boston and Cambridge), Kane’s Donuts (downtown Boston and Saugus), and Lionheart Confections (popping up in and around Boston)

Further reading: An Illustrated Guide to Boston's Delicious Doughnuts; A Baker's Dozen Boston-Area Doughnuts That Expand Waistlines, Not Debt

Union Square maple bacon doughnut
Maple bacon doughnut at Union Square Doughnuts
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

7. Oleana: Baked Alaska

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134 Hampshire St
Cambridge, MA
(617) 661-0505
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Boston’s been paying particular attention to desserts recently; talented pastry chefs are making names for themselves with beautifully plated, intricate creations that in some cases overshadow the main courses. But go back a few years before the explosive growth of Boston’s dessert scene, and you’ll find one classic that has always been there — the lovely baked Alaska at Oleana, full of coconut ice cream and sitting in a sweet pool of passion fruit caramel.

Other dishes to try at Oleana: meze-style vegetable tasting menu (not currently available on the limited COVID-era menu), Sultan’s delight, Turkish-style profiteroles

If you like this, also try: any dessert from the up-and-coming new class of incredible pastry chefs, including Brian Mercury at Cafe Beatrice and Giselle Miller at Bird & Wolf

Further reading: The Road to the 38: Oleana and Sarma in Boston

Glamour shot of a baked Alaska dessert on a black background, featuring a billowy, charred cloud of meringue
Baked Alaska at Oleana
Kristin Teig

8. Regina Pizza: The Giambotta

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11 1/2 Thacher St
Boston, MA
(617) 227-0765
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Sure, nowadays the Polcari family’s Regina Pizza is a chain with a tendency to open up locations in malls, and Boston’s pizza scene has exploded with plenty of new options since the days of Regina’s domination, but there’s no denying the importance of the original North End location of this classic brick oven pizzeria, which opened back in 1926. And yes, it still draws long lines. For a true Regina experience, get the Giambotta pizza, which includes all of the traditional toppings — pepperoni, sausage, salami, mushrooms, onions, peppers, and anchovies (upon request).

Note: The Regina Pizza name refers to full-service pizza locations, while Regina Pizzeria refers to quick-service locations, such as the ones at malls. There are also two locations of Polcari’s Italian Restaurant, the family’s full-service restaurant that features a full Italian menu in addition to pizza.

Other dishes to try at Regina Pizza: Napoletana pizza (“old world style anchovy”), shrimp scampi and spinach pizza, margherita pizza

If you like this, also try: Regina’s historic “rival,” Santarpio’s in East Boston, for similar old-school pizza. Galleria Umberto is another classic North End spot, albeit a completely different style than Regina — it’s a cash-only, lunch-only, barebones spot that specializes in Sicilian slices. (See also: Leone’s in Somerville.) Across the river in Cambridge, the NY-style pizza game is strong at old-timers Newtowne Grille and Armando’s. And for a peek at Boston’s newer generation of pizza, with an emphasis on wood-fired ovens, head to Area Four in Cambridge, Brewer’s Fork in Charlestown, and Posto in Somerville. And that’s just the very tip of Boston’s pizza iceberg.

Further reading: Richie Zapata on 18 Years at Regina Pizzeria; Essential Pizzas in the Boston Area; Boston’s Holy Pizza Trinity Has Been Feeding the City for Decades

A sliced pizza covered with peppers and onions
Pizza at Regina
Regina Pizzeria/Official Site

9. Mike's Pastry: Cannoli

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300 Hanover St
Boston, MA
(617) 742-3050
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The subject of one of Boston’s fiercest food debates is cannoli. In the eyes of locals, Mike’s Pastry may or may not win out all the time — you’ll get a different answer from every person you ask — but it’s been a destination for tourists and Bostonians for decades, and there’s something about that tied-up white box that always triggers a cannoli craving. Mike’s expanded to Cambridge’s Harvard Square and Somerville’s Assembly Row in recent years.

Other dishes to try at Mike’s Pastry: lobster tail, assorted cookies

If you like this, also try: cannoli at Modern Pastry, the other remaining member of the North End cannoli “rivalry” (another favorite, Maria’s, closed in 2019)

Further reading: A North End Cannoli Crawl; Take the Cannoli: One Pastry’s Rise From Sicilian Treat to Iconic Dessert

A single cannolo, stuffed with an orange-yellow filling and dusted with powdered sugar
A cannolo at Mike’s Pastry
Katie Chudy/Eater

10. KO Pies at the Shipyard: Irish Beef Stew Meat Pie

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256 Marginal St
East Boston, MA
(617) 418-5234
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You won’t find any restaurant quite like this anywhere else in the Boston area. It’s tucked away in Eastie’s oddly artistic Boston Harbor Shipyard, giving it a hidden gem vibe, and the Boston skyline views can’t be beat. And then there’s the Australian food, particularly the hearty meat pies, the cure for everything. Try the Irish beef stew pie. (KO Pies is sadly closing this summer, but its replacement, Seabiscuit, will keep the pies alive.)

Other dishes to try at KO Pies at the Shipyard: sausage roll, fish and chips, piri piri chicken sandwich

If you like this, also try: meat pies and sausage rolls at Cuppacoffee, the only other Australian-inspired dining spot in Boston. Cuppacoffee has two locations (South End and West End). Harvard Square restaurant Park also serves a meat pie (flavors change daily), although it’s not Australian-style; it’s more of a British-style huntsman pie.

Further reading: The Ultimate Guide to Boston's Dough-Wrapped Meats

A flaky Australian meat pie with a bite taken out of it is garnished with a large dollop of ketchup
Meat pie at KO Catering & Pies
Callaway Photo

11. Toscanini's: Any Flavor of Ice Cream

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899 Main St
Cambridge, MA
(617) 491-5877
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Boston adores ice cream, and there are plentiful options in most parts of town, but one is a bit more iconic than the others. Open since 1981, Toscanini’s is one of the most celebrated ice cream destinations around, garnering quite a bit of press locally and beyond thanks to flavors such as B3 (brown sugar, brown butter, brownies), burnt caramel, early grey, and more. Note: This location is temporarily closed due to construction, but there’s a new one nearby at 159 First St. in East Cambridge.

Other dishes to try at Toscanini’s: micro sundae, affogato, ice cream sandwich

If you like this, also try: ice cream at Christina’s or Honeycomb Creamery, both in Cambridge, or at Gracie’s Ice Cream or Forge Ice Cream Bar, both in Somerville

Further reading: Around Massachusetts in 20 Ice Creams; The Coolest New Boston Ice Cream Shops

A scoop of chocolate ice cream in a branded yellow cup from Toscanini’s, with chunks of chocolate scattered in the background
Ice cream at Toscanini’s
Toscanini’s/Official Site

12. Craigie on Main: Burger

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853 Main St
Cambridge, MA
(617) 497-5511
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One of the original high-end burgers in the Boston area, the legendary Craigie burger still inspires lines of hungry fans. In non-COVID times, it’s sold in limited quantities at the bar right at opening, and it generally goes quickly. The burger, served on a milk-style bun, features a grass-fed beef patty that is ground in-house, Shelburne Farm cheddar, mace ketchup, and a lettuce-and-onion mixture dressed in “burger vinaigrette.” Seasonally, there’s a tomato slice. Optional add-ons: bacon and an egg. (Craigie is currently only offering outdoor dining with a family-style chef’s whim menu, but the burger will likely return soon when takeout resumes.)

Other dishes to try at Craigie on Main: In non-COVID times, the majority of the menu changes constantly, but two large-format dishes (meant for two) are fantastic old standbys — the confit and roasted milk-fed pig’s head and the whole roasted Green Circle chicken.

If you like this, also try: the “secret burger” at Alden & Harlow and the cheeseburger at Steel & Rye are a couple of worthy local burgers around the same price as the Craigie burger. For a more casual burger, head to Highland Kitchen or Daddy Jones in Somerville.

Further reading: The Reluctant Burger Titans of Boston; Anatomy of an Icon: The Craigie on Main Burger; Essential Boston-Area Burgers

Close-up photo of a burger with lettuce and bacon visible, as well as some thick-cut fries on the edge of the plate
The burger at Craigie on Main
Bill Addison/Eater

13. Neptune Oyster: Maine Lobster Roll

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63 Salem St
Boston, MA
(617) 742-3474
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If someone were to write up an FAQ list for Boston tourist dining inquiries, “Where should I go for a lobster roll?” would certainly be one of the top questions. There are plenty of options at a variety of price points, and whether you want no mayo, a tiny bit of mayo, or all the mayo — or hot butter — there’s something for everyone. But to answer the question simply, you should go to Neptune Oyster for a lobster roll. Yes, you’ll have to wait in line. Yes, it’s pricey. But when it comes to an iconic Boston lobster roll, this is the one. Available hot with butter or cold with mayo, served on a toasted roll. (Also available without the roll if that’s your thing.)

Other dishes to try at Neptune Oyster: fried Ipswich clams, Neptune johnnycake, Wellfleet clam chowder

If you like this, also try: Row 34 and B&G Oysters for other excellent lobster rolls on the full-service end. For a more casual lobster roll adventure, try classic spots Yankee Lobster Co. and James Hook & Co. Or venture into residential Cambridge for Alive & Kicking’s cult favorite lobster sandwich.

Further reading: Local Chefs Weigh in on the Great Lobster Roll Debate: Hot vs. Cold; Boston Oysters Worth the Wait at Neptune and B&G; Where to Eat Lobster Rolls in Boston

A lobster roll with a side of fries and ketchup sits on a white plate on a marble bar
The lobster roll (hot with butter) at Neptune Oyster
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

14. Parker's Restaurant: Boston Cream Pie

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60 School St
Boston, MA
(617) 725-1600
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One of the most decidedly Boston dishes bears the city’s name and dates all the way back to 1856. Originally called the chocolate cream pie, the Boston cream pie — which is actually a cake — was born at Parker’s Restaurant at the Omni Parker House, where it’s still available. The restaurant will even ship it anywhere in the country.

Other dishes to try at Parker’s Restaurant: Parker House rolls, which were also created here and are now lovingly imitated at restaurants throughout the area

If you like this, also try: Boston cream pie at Flour Bakery & Cafe, Boston cream doughnut at Union Square Donuts, vegan chocolate cream pie at Veggie Galaxy

Further reading: How Omni Parker House's Boston Cream Pie Became a Slice of Local History; The Ubiquitous Boston Cream Pie

A small round piece of Boston cream pie sits on a white plate, garnished with a strawberry, chocolate sauce shaped like a row of hearts, and whipped cream
Boston Cream Pie at Parker’s Restaurant
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

15. No. 9 Park: Prune-Stuffed Gnocchi

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9 Park St
Boston, MA
(617) 742-9991
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Open for over two decades, this classic Barbara Lynch restaurant will probably never remove the prune-stuffed gnocchi from the menu. The longtime staple, a rich dish embellished with foie gras, almonds, and vin santo, harkens back to the stately white-tablecloth era of Boston dining.

Other dishes to try at No. 9 Park: The menu’s always changing, but keep an eye out for a dish featuring Rohan duck or Berkshire pork

If you like this, also try: other classic Boston-area pasta dishes, such as lobster ravioli at Rino’s in East Boston, chitarra at Gran Gusto in Cambridge, and squid ink aglio olio at the Daily Catch in Brookline

Further reading: How Barbara Lynch Built Her Restaurant Empire; The Most Comforting New Pasta Dishes in Boston

16. Gene's Chinese Flatbread Cafe: Hand-Pulled Noodles

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86 Bedford St
Boston, MA
(617) 482-1888
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Gene’s first opened in Chelmsford in 2011 and quickly developed a cult following for its Xi’an-style hand-pulled noodles — garlicky, chewy perfection — a dish impossible to find elsewhere in the Boston area at the time. Since then, Gene’s has expanded to Boston proper, Westford, and Woburn (the Chelmsford location is now closed.) These days, Boston now has a few other options for hand-pulled noodles — and New York City’s popular chain, Xi’an Famous Foods, has been eyeing expansion here since 2012 — but Gene’s is still the one to beat.

Other dishes to try at Gene’s Chinese Flatbread Cafe: hot sour hand-pulled noodles soup, lamb flatbread sandwiches, Xi’an chilled noodles (weekends only)

If you like this, also try: hand-pulled noodles at Home Taste in Watertown, MDM Noodles in Brighton, Xi’an Rougamo in Downtown Crossing, or Noodles King at Longwood

Further reading: Alton Brown Had a Noodle Party in Boston

A black plastic bowl of thick hand-pulled noodles, heavily dusted with chile powder and topped with greens and a generous dollop of garlic. A wooden skewer of lamb pieces sits across the rim of the bowl, which is on a Chinese Zodiac placemat on a red tray
Hand-pulled noodles with a lamb skewer at Gene’s Chinese Flatbread Cafe
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

17. O Ya: Omakase

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9 East St
Boston, MA
(617) 654-9900
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If money’s no object, one of the best ways to go all-out for an epic Boston meal is to try the O Ya tasting menu, which is currently $250 for around 20 courses. Over the years, the menu has been packed with memorable bites, including the “Faberge” onsen egg with caviar and gold leaf; a small portion of the best steak you’ll ever eat, the wagyu seared petit A5 strip loin; the foie gras nigiri with balsamic chocolate kabayaki; and “legs & eggs,” a combination of tiny Maine lobster legs and caviar.

Other dishes to try at O Ya: fried kumamato oyster, hamachi with banana pepper, tea brined fried pork ribs

If you like this, also try: the omakase dinners at Uni in Back Bay, Oishii in the South End, Cafe Sushi in Harvard Square, and Umami in Cambridge

Further reading: The Road to the 38: O Ya in Boston; Outstanding Boston Sushi Restaurants

In O Ya’s “legs & eggs” dish, several pieces of sushi sit on a plate, topped with caviar and Maine lobster
“Legs and eggs” at O Ya
Bill Addison/Eater

18. Drink: Talk to the Bartender

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348 Congress St
Boston, MA
(617) 695-1806
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Barbara Lynch’s subterranean cocktail bar helped usher in a new era of cocktail enthusiasm in Boston. No drink lists here; just have a discussion with your bartender about your likes, dislikes, or what you’re feeling, and you will receive an expertly crafted drink that fits your mood. Try to go at off-peak hours for a shorter wait and a more in-depth chat with your bartender.

Other dishes to try at Drink: Cocktails are the focus, but don’t miss the food, such as the wagyu burger.

If you like this, also try: anything at Backbar in Somerville, where the bartenders will also happily make suggestions if you want to go off-menu. Any of the daily or weekly specials are also an excellent bet. Brick & Mortar in Central Square should be on your cocktail shortlist as well.

Further reading: Essential Cocktail Bars in Boston

19. Mei Mei: Double Awesome

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506 Park Drive
Boston, MA
(857) 250-4959
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Scallion pancakes are awesome on their own, but what happens when you use them as a replacement for sandwich bread and fill up that sandwich with pesto, cheddar, oozy eggs, and optional meat (bacon, ham, or turkey)? You get something that is double awesome. Mei Mei — Eater Boston’s 2014 restaurant of the year — is no longer a restaurant, per se, as it is focusing more on national dumpling distribution these days, but you can still pick up prepared meals and specialty grocery items from Mei Mei’s Fenway headquarters, including a double awesome meal kit.

Other dishes to try at Mei Mei: cheddar scallion potato dumplings

If you like this, also try: the crispy scallion pancake wrap with beef at Bess’s Cafe in Brookline

Further reading: Mei Mei's Irene Li and Max Hull on Meat Responsibility; Irene Li: An Advocate for Local Sourcing and Efficiency

Eggs and greens are nestled in two folded scallion pancakes
Double Awesome at Mei Mei
Mei Mei/Official Site

20. Sweet Cheeks: Bucket o’ Biscuits

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1381 Boylston St
Boston, MA
(617) 266-1300
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Don’t take it as an insult to the rest of Sweet Cheeks’ menu that the restaurant’s iconic dish is merely a side — the Sweet Cheeks jumbo biscuits, served with honey butter, are just that good, and they’re an essential complement to whatever else you choose to order. These fluffy, big-as-your-face biscuits will draw you back to this Fenway barbecue spot again and again. Optional: Add on a seasonal jam.

Other dishes to try at Sweet Cheeks: pork belly, brisket, mac n’ cheese, farm salad

If you like this, also try: agave-glazed blue cornmeal biscuits at Citrus & Salt

Further reading: Where to Eat Barbecue in Boston; A Handy Map of Boston-Area Barbecue Joints

A dramatic black and white photo of a basket of large biscuits, accompanied by a small mason jar of butter
Sweet Cheeks biscuits
Sweet Cheeks/Official Site

21. Sullivan's: Hot Dog

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2080 Day Blvd
Boston, MA
(617) 268-5685
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Located on Castle Island, this seasonal Southie mainstay has been serving up inexpensive hot dogs, burgers, fried seafood, ice cream, and more since 1951. There’s no seating inside; grab a picnic table and enjoy the outdoors. Each season, Sullivan’s opens during the last week of February — the first sign that spring is near.

Other dishes to try at Sullivan’s: lobster roll, fried clam bellies, cheeseburger

If you like this, also try: a Fenway frank at Fenway Park, a simple griddled dog or the dog of the day at Trina’s Starlite Lounge

Further reading: 25 Hot Dogs to Eat Around Boston This Summer

A double cheeseburger, hot dog topped with relish, container of fries, and cup of soda sit outside in the sun
Food at Sullivan’s
Sullivan’s/Official Site

22. Flour Bakery & Cafe: Sticky Bun

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1595 Washington St
Boston, MA
(617) 267-4300
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Joanne Chang first opened Flour in the South End in 2000, eventually expanding the bakery and cafe throughout Boston and Cambridge. Today, there are nine locations. They all serve up a wide variety of baked goods, from cakes and pies to scones and muffins, not to mention full meals, including sandwiches, salads, and more. But there’s one item that has always been synonymous with Flour: the sticky bun. Dripping with caramel and sprinkled with toasted pecans, Flour’s sticky bun is one popular pastry.

Other dishes to try at Flour: meringue clouds, chunky lola cookie, roasted lamb sandwich

If you like this, also try: Mistral’s warm cinnamon buns (available at brunch, which is currently paused), Lionheart Confections’ ube cinnamon roll (available at some pop-ups)

Further reading: Boston's Best Baked Goods and Pastries, According to Local Pastry Chefs

A closeup shot of the Flour sticky bun, one of Boston’s iconic dishes, sitting on a white plate on a wooden counter
The Flour sticky bun
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

23. Toro: Maíz Asado con Alioli y Queso Cotija

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1704 Washington St
Boston, MA
(617) 536-4300
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Longtime South End tapas destination Toro serves up plenty of crowd-pleasers, including popular paellas, but if there’s one dish that Bostonians talk about when describing the restaurant — or even the neighborhood as a whole — it’s Toro’s corn on the cob, grilled and slathered with alioli, cheese, lime, and pepper. Sitting on the restaurant’s sidewalk patio and devouring a portion or two of Toro’s take on Mexican street corn is the ideal way to spend a summer evening.

Other dishes to try at Toro: paella valenciana, gambas al ajillo

If you like this, also try: grilled street corn at Lone Star Taco Bar (Allston, East Cambridge), del elotero del triciclo at El Centro (South End and Dedham)

Further reading: Life Lessons From Toro Dream Team Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette

Four ears of corn, charred and topped with aioli, cotija, and lime wedges, sit side-by-side on a plate
Maíz asado con alioli y queso cotija at Toro
Andrea Merrill

24. Cutty's: Buttermilk Fried Chicken Sandwich (available one Sunday each month)

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284 Washington St
Brookline, MA
(617) 505-1844
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This cozy Brookline Village sandwich shop churns out plenty of excellent sandwiches, but it’s the long-running one-Sunday-a-month event, Super Cluckin’ Sunday, that inspires lengthy (but fast-moving) lines. On these special Sundays, advertised months ahead of time on the Cutty’s website, the regular menu flies out the window and is replaced with the buttermilk fried chicken sandwich (ranch dressing, barbecue sauce, shredded iceberg lettuce, and shaved sweet onion on a buttered sesame brioche bun from Iggy’s), drinks, hand pies, and potato chips. 10 a.m. until the chicken’s gone.

Other dishes to try at Cutty’s: red flannel hash breakfast sandwich, roast beef 1000 sandwich, pork rabe sandwich

If you like this, also try: Mike & Patty’s fancy sandwich, Sam LaGrassa’s Rumanian pastrami sandwich, and Tenoch’s Tenoch torta, in terms of local must-try sandwiches. On the fried chicken side, head to Highland Fried or Coast Cafe, both in Cambridge.

Further reading: Boston’s Essential Fried Chicken

A fried chicken sandwich on a sesame bun is topped with slaw and sits on an orange tray
Buttermilk fried chicken sandwich at Cutty’s
Cutty’s/Official Site

25. The Haven: Haggis

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2 Perkins St
Boston, MA
(617) 524-2836
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Looking to try haggis without the flight to Scotland? Here’s your chance. Jamaica Plain “Scottish headquarters” the Haven serves house-made lamb haggis with truffle honey mashed rutabagas and Drambuie butter, and you won’t find this anywhere else in the area. For nearly a decade, the Haven has been holding its own as one of the only local sources for Scottish cuisine.

Other dishes to try at the Haven: scotch deviled egg, the Haven burger, fish supper, deep-fried Mars bar

Further reading: The Haven: Five Years as Boston's 'Scottish Headquarters'

A portion of haggis sits on a bed of mashed rutabaga, garnished with Drambuie butter
Haggis at the Haven
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

26. Bánh Mì Ba Le: Banh Mi

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1052 Dorchester Ave
Boston, MA
(617) 265-7171
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Lucky for lovers of banh mi and pho, Boston has quite a Vietnamese food scene, particularly in Dorchester. If you’re visiting Boston and only have time for one banh mi, make it the outstanding one at Ba Le, which will only set you back $3.50. Ba Le’s version features spiced pork and shredded pork skin, pickled carrots, daikon, cucumber, cilantro, a choice of hot peppers, and special sauce, served on a baguette that achieves that enviable crispy-on-the-outside-soft-on-the-inside balance.

Other dishes to try at Bánh Mì Ba Le: shrimp summer rolls, sticky rice with sausage

If you like this, also try: the banh mi at Pho Viet’s in Allston and at Cicada Coffee Bar in Cambridge

Further reading: A Neighborhood Food Crawl Through Dorchester

Hands hold two banh mi over pavement
Banh mi from Banh Mi Ba Le
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

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1. Woodman’s of Essex: “Chubby’s Original” Fried Clam Plate

121 Main St, Essex, MA 01929
A paper plate is stacked high with fried onion rings, clams, and fries, with cups of ketchup to the side, served on a cardboard tray on a red checkered tablecloth.
“Chubby’s Original” fried clam plate at Woodman’s of Essex
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Nothing screams “summer in New England” like a plate of fried clams — ideally accompanied by fries and onion rings as well. And fortunately it’s not just available in the summer; this classic North Shore spot, founded more than a century ago, is open year-round. Woodman’s claims to have invented fried clams.

The restaurant separates its food counter from its drink counter, so be sure to proceed to the beverage line (there’s a full bar available) after placing your food order. There’s plenty of seating inside and out.

Other dishes to try at Woodman’s of Essex: clam cakes, clam chowder, hot boiled lobster (choose your own) with drawn butter

If you like this, also try: fried clams at J.T. Farnham’s (also in Essex), Clam Box (Ipswich), or Bob’s Clam Hut (Kittery, Maine)

Further reading: Shack Food: Casual Summer Dining in New England; Where to Eat Fried Clams in and Around Boston

121 Main St
Essex, MA 01929

2. Kelly's Roast Beef: Roast Beef Sandwich

410 Revere Beach Blvd, Revere, MA 02151
A roast beef sandwich with cheese, mayo, and barbecue sauce sits on a paper plate, accompanied by thick onion rings.
Roast beef sandwich at Kelly’s Roast Beef
Katie Chudy/Eater

Roast beef sandwiches are practically ubiquitous in Massachusetts, particularly in the North Shore region, and there is no roast beef spot more well-known than Kelly’s Roast Beef, which opened in 1951 on Revere Beach. (These days, there are also four other locations — Saugus, Danvers, Medford, and Logan Airport.) The company even claims to have invented the roast beef sandwich in the form that it appears around the state, and mega-chain Arby’s acknowledges drawing inspiration from Kelly’s.

True North Shore roast beef fans tend to go for the “three-way” sandwich, which comes topped with James River barbecue sauce, basic Land O’Lakes white American cheese, and mayonnaise.

Other dishes to try at Kelly’s Roast Beef: lobster roll, clam chowder

If you like this, also try: roast beef 1000 at Cutty’s in Brookline, beef on weck at All Star Sandwich Bar in Cambridge, or the roast beef sandwich at Hot Box in Somerville

Further reading: How Kelly’s Roast Beef Soared From Simple Sandwich to State Icon

410 Revere Beach Blvd
Revere, MA 02151

3. Yume Wo Katare: Ramen

1923 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA
Ramen noodles and slices of pork are stacked impossibly high in a white bowl, topped with ample garlic.
Ramen at Yume Wo Katare
Yume Wo Katare [Official Photo]

Boston has no dearth of ramen options these days, but one of the most unique options in town is an eccentric little shop in Cambridge’s Porter Square where diners stand up and share their dreams after finishing massive bowls of jiro-style ramen (a hefty pork-topped style not found elsewhere in the Boston area). In non-COVID times, the menu was simple: two sizes of ramen, and each could be served with one slice of pork (kids only), two slices, or five slices. There was no takeout, aside from a 500-gram block of pork, and the shop only took cash and generally had long lines. Currently, though, it’s only open for takeout with online ordering available and a slightly larger menu.

Other dishes to try at Yume Wo Katare: As noted above, there are generally no other options. However, there are occasionally seasonal specials; keep an eye on Facebook for details. On the coldest days of winter, for instance, there may be a spicy ramen available. Or head to its sibling down the street, Yume Ga Arukara, for udon.

If you like this, also try: ramen from Ganko Ittetsu Ramen in Brookline, Pagu in Cambridge, or Pikaichi in Medford

Further reading: Warm up at These Ramen Destinations

1923 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA

4. Bagelsaurus: T-Rex Bagel Sandwich

1796 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA
A hand holds a halved bagel sandwich in front of a white brick wall, showcasing the filling of almond butter, banana, honey, and bacon
T-Rex at Bagelsaurus
Bagelsaurus [Official Photo]

Bagelsaurus started as a pop-up at Cutty’s in Brookline before opening in its own Cambridge space in late 2014. The perpetually crowded bagel spot is an Eater Boston reader favorite, snagging the win in a 2014 poll of Boston’s best bagels and winning again in a 2016 Breakfast Week poll thanks to the T-Rex bagel sandwich, stuffed with almond butter, banana, honey, and optional bacon.

Other dishes to try at Bagelsaurus: hot smoked bagel sandwich, bialy, everything bagel

If you like this, also try: bagels from Katz Bagel Bakery in Chelsea, Rosenfeld’s Bagels in Newton, Exodus in Roslindale, and Goldilox in Medford

Further reading: There's Always a Crowd at Bagelsaurus, Even on Weekdays

1796 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA

5. Neighborhood Restaurant: Cream of Wheat

25 Bow St, Somerville, MA
A white bowl of Cream of Wheat sits on a dark background, topped with a generous sprinkling of cinnamon
Cream of Wheat at Neighborhood
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Non-Somerville residents may raise a confused eyebrow to learn that one of the most iconic dishes in town is a humble bowl of Cream of Wheat, but anyone who has ever braved the line for brunch at Neighborhood — ideally on the pastel umbrella-bedecked seasonal patio — knows the truth. Every Neighborhood breakfast comes with a choice of fruit or Cream of Wheat. Don’t make the wrong choice. (Note: You can also order Cream of Wheat on its own, and it’s available for takeout as well. Let this information get you through all future Somerville winters.)

Other dishes to try at Neighborhood: anything from the specials menu, which is always jam-packed with over-the-top pancake and French toast options

If you like this, also try: other classic Somerville brunches at Supreme Kitchen and Renee’s Cafe

Further reading: Breakfast, Borges Style, at the Neighborhood Restaurant and Bakery; The Boston Breakfast and Brunch Guide

25 Bow St
Somerville, MA

6. Union Square Donuts: Maple Bacon Doughnut

20 Bow St, Somerville, MA
Union Square maple bacon doughnut
Maple bacon doughnut at Union Square Doughnuts
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Union Square Donuts has expanded beyond its Somerville home, now with satellite locations in Brookline, at the Boston Public Market, and at Time Out Market Boston, not to mention distribution of doughnut holes to various area businesses. But the growing company hasn’t lost its focus and still knows how to please fans and draw long lines, particularly on weekends. A mainstay on the menu since day one, the maple bacon doughnut delicately toes the line between sweet and savory, making it the ideal brunch treat.

Other dishes to try at Union Square Donuts: brown butter hazelnut crunch doughnut, orange creamsicle doughnut, sea salted bourbon caramel doughnut

If you like this, also try: doughnuts at Blackbird Doughnuts (multiple locations around Boston and Cambridge), Kane’s Donuts (downtown Boston and Saugus), and Lionheart Confections (popping up in and around Boston)

Further reading: An Illustrated Guide to Boston's Delicious Doughnuts; A Baker's Dozen Boston-Area Doughnuts That Expand Waistlines, Not Debt

20 Bow St
Somerville, MA

7. Oleana: Baked Alaska

134 Hampshire St, Cambridge, MA
Glamour shot of a baked Alaska dessert on a black background, featuring a billowy, charred cloud of meringue
Baked Alaska at Oleana
Kristin Teig

Boston’s been paying particular attention to desserts recently; talented pastry chefs are making names for themselves with beautifully plated, intricate creations that in some cases overshadow the main courses. But go back a few years before the explosive growth of Boston’s dessert scene, and you’ll find one classic that has always been there — the lovely baked Alaska at Oleana, full of coconut ice cream and sitting in a sweet pool of passion fruit caramel.

Other dishes to try at Oleana: meze-style vegetable tasting menu (not currently available on the limited COVID-era menu), Sultan’s delight, Turkish-style profiteroles

If you like this, also try: any dessert from the up-and-coming new class of incredible pastry chefs, including Brian Mercury at Cafe Beatrice and Giselle Miller at Bird & Wolf

Further reading: The Road to the 38: Oleana and Sarma in Boston

134 Hampshire St
Cambridge, MA

8. Regina Pizza: The Giambotta

11 1/2 Thacher St, Boston, MA
A sliced pizza covered with peppers and onions
Pizza at Regina
Regina Pizzeria/Official Site

Sure, nowadays the Polcari family’s Regina Pizza is a chain with a tendency to open up locations in malls, and Boston’s pizza scene has exploded with plenty of new options since the days of Regina’s domination, but there’s no denying the importance of the original North End location of this classic brick oven pizzeria, which opened back in 1926. And yes, it still draws long lines. For a true Regina experience, get the Giambotta pizza, which includes all of the traditional toppings — pepperoni, sausage, salami, mushrooms, onions, peppers, and anchovies (upon request).

Note: The Regina Pizza name refers to full-service pizza locations, while Regina Pizzeria refers to quick-service locations, such as the ones at malls. There are also two locations of Polcari’s Italian Restaurant, the family’s full-service restaurant that features a full Italian menu in addition to pizza.

Other dishes to try at Regina Pizza: Napoletana pizza (“old world style anchovy”), shrimp scampi and spinach pizza, margherita pizza

If you like this, also try: Regina’s historic “rival,” Santarpio’s in East Boston, for similar old-school pizza. Galleria Umberto is another classic North End spot, albeit a completely different style than Regina — it’s a cash-only, lunch-only, barebones spot that specializes in Sicilian slices. (See also: Leone’s in Somerville.) Across the river in Cambridge, the NY-style pizza game is strong at old-timers Newtowne Grille and Armando’s. And for a peek at Boston’s newer generation of pizza, with an emphasis on wood-fired ovens, head to Area Four in Cambridge, Brewer’s Fork in Charlestown, and Posto in Somerville. And that’s just the very tip of Boston’s pizza iceberg.

Further reading: Richie Zapata on 18 Years at Regina Pizzeria; Essential Pizzas in the Boston Area; Boston’s Holy Pizza Trinity Has Been Feeding the City for Decades

11 1/2 Thacher St
Boston, MA

9. Mike's Pastry: Cannoli

300 Hanover St, Boston, MA
A single cannolo, stuffed with an orange-yellow filling and dusted with powdered sugar
A cannolo at Mike’s Pastry
Katie Chudy/Eater

The subject of one of Boston’s fiercest food debates is cannoli. In the eyes of locals, Mike’s Pastry may or may not win out all the time — you’ll get a different answer from every person you ask — but it’s been a destination for tourists and Bostonians for decades, and there’s something about that tied-up white box that always triggers a cannoli craving. Mike’s expanded to Cambridge’s Harvard Square and Somerville’s Assembly Row in recent years.

Other dishes to try at Mike’s Pastry: lobster tail, assorted cookies

If you like this, also try: cannoli at Modern Pastry, the other remaining member of the North End cannoli “rivalry” (another favorite, Maria’s, closed in 2019)

Further reading: A North End Cannoli Crawl; Take the Cannoli: One Pastry’s Rise From Sicilian Treat to Iconic Dessert

300 Hanover St
Boston, MA

10. KO Pies at the Shipyard: Irish Beef Stew Meat Pie

256 Marginal St, East Boston, MA
A flaky Australian meat pie with a bite taken out of it is garnished with a large dollop of ketchup
Meat pie at KO Catering & Pies
Callaway Photo

You won’t find any restaurant quite like this anywhere else in the Boston area. It’s tucked away in Eastie’s oddly artistic Boston Harbor Shipyard, giving it a hidden gem vibe, and the Boston skyline views can’t be beat. And then there’s the Australian food, particularly the hearty meat pies, the cure for everything. Try the Irish beef stew pie. (KO Pies is sadly closing this summer, but its replacement, Seabiscuit, will keep the pies alive.)

Other dishes to try at KO Pies at the Shipyard: sausage roll, fish and chips, piri piri chicken sandwich

If you like this, also try: meat pies and sausage rolls at Cuppacoffee, the only other Australian-inspired dining spot in Boston. Cuppacoffee has two locations (South End and West End). Harvard Square restaurant Park also serves a meat pie (flavors change daily), although it’s not Australian-style; it’s more of a British-style huntsman pie.

Further reading: The Ultimate Guide to Boston's Dough-Wrapped Meats

256 Marginal St
East Boston, MA

11. Toscanini's: Any Flavor of Ice Cream

899 Main St, Cambridge, MA
A scoop of chocolate ice cream in a branded yellow cup from Toscanini’s, with chunks of chocolate scattered in the background
Ice cream at Toscanini’s
Toscanini’s/Official Site

Boston adores ice cream, and there are plentiful options in most parts of town, but one is a bit more iconic than the others. Open since 1981, Toscanini’s is one of the most celebrated ice cream destinations around, garnering quite a bit of press locally and beyond thanks to flavors such as B3 (brown sugar, brown butter, brownies), burnt caramel, early grey, and more. Note: This location is temporarily closed due to construction, but there’s a new one nearby at 159 First St. in East Cambridge.

Other dishes to try at Toscanini’s: micro sundae, affogato, ice cream sandwich

If you like this, also try: ice cream at Christina’s or Honeycomb Creamery, both in Cambridge, or at Gracie’s Ice Cream or Forge Ice Cream Bar, both in Somerville

Further reading: Around Massachusetts in 20 Ice Creams; The Coolest New Boston Ice Cream Shops

899 Main St
Cambridge, MA

12. Craigie on Main: Burger

853 Main St, Cambridge, MA
Close-up photo of a burger with lettuce and bacon visible, as well as some thick-cut fries on the edge of the plate
The burger at Craigie on Main
Bill Addison/Eater

One of the original high-end burgers in the Boston area, the legendary Craigie burger still inspires lines of hungry fans. In non-COVID times, it’s sold in limited quantities at the bar right at opening, and it generally goes quickly. The burger, served on a milk-style bun, features a grass-fed beef patty that is ground in-house, Shelburne Farm cheddar, mace ketchup, and a lettuce-and-onion mixture dressed in “burger vinaigrette.” Seasonally, there’s a tomato slice. Optional add-ons: bacon and an egg. (Craigie is currently only offering outdoor dining with a family-style chef’s whim menu, but the burger will likely return soon when takeout resumes.)

Other dishes to try at Craigie on Main: In non-COVID times, the majority of the menu changes constantly, but two large-format dishes (meant for two) are fantastic old standbys — the confit and roasted milk-fed pig’s head and the whole roasted Green Circle chicken.

If you like this, also try: the “secret burger” at Alden & Harlow and the cheeseburger at Steel & Rye are a couple of worthy local burgers around the same price as the Craigie burger. For a more casual burger, head to Highland Kitchen or Daddy Jones in Somerville.

Further reading: The Reluctant Burger Titans of Boston; Anatomy of an Icon: The Craigie on Main Burger; Essential Boston-Area Burgers

853 Main St
Cambridge, MA

13. Neptune Oyster: Maine Lobster Roll

63 Salem St, Boston, MA
A lobster roll with a side of fries and ketchup sits on a white plate on a marble bar
The lobster roll (hot with butter) at Neptune Oyster
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

If someone were to write up an FAQ list for Boston tourist dining inquiries, “Where should I go for a lobster roll?” would certainly be one of the top questions. There are plenty of options at a variety of price points, and whether you want no mayo, a tiny bit of mayo, or all the mayo — or hot butter — there’s something for everyone. But to answer the question simply, you should go to Neptune Oyster for a lobster roll. Yes, you’ll have to wait in line. Yes, it’s pricey. But when it comes to an iconic Boston lobster roll, this is the one. Available hot with butter or cold with mayo, served on a toasted roll. (Also available without the roll if that’s your thing.)

Other dishes to try at Neptune Oyster: fried Ipswich clams, Neptune johnnycake, Wellfleet clam chowder

If you like this, also try: Row 34 and B&G Oysters for other excellent lobster rolls on the full-service end. For a more casual lobster roll adventure, try classic spots Yankee Lobster Co. and James Hook & Co. Or venture into residential Cambridge for Alive & Kicking’s cult favorite lobster sandwich.

Further reading: Local Chefs Weigh in on the Great Lobster Roll Debate: Hot vs. Cold; Boston Oysters Worth the Wait at Neptune and B&G; Where to Eat Lobster Rolls in Boston

63 Salem St
Boston, MA

14. Parker's Restaurant: Boston Cream Pie

60 School St, Boston, MA
A small round piece of Boston cream pie sits on a white plate, garnished with a strawberry, chocolate sauce shaped like a row of hearts, and whipped cream
Boston Cream Pie at Parker’s Restaurant
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

One of the most decidedly Boston dishes bears the city’s name and dates all the way back to 1856. Originally called the chocolate cream pie, the Boston cream pie — which is actually a cake — was born at Parker’s Restaurant at the Omni Parker House, where it’s still available. The restaurant will even ship it anywhere in the country.

Other dishes to try at Parker’s Restaurant: Parker House rolls, which were also created here and are now lovingly imitated at restaurants throughout the area

If you like this, also try: Boston cream pie at Flour Bakery & Cafe, Boston cream doughnut at Union Square Donuts, vegan chocolate cream pie at Veggie Galaxy

Further reading: How Omni Parker House's Boston Cream Pie Became a Slice of Local History; The Ubiquitous Boston Cream Pie

60 School St
Boston, MA

15. No. 9 Park: Prune-Stuffed Gnocchi

9 Park St, Boston, MA

Open for over two decades, this classic Barbara Lynch restaurant will probably never remove the prune-stuffed gnocchi from the menu. The longtime staple, a rich dish embellished with foie gras, almonds, and vin santo, harkens back to the stately white-tablecloth era of Boston dining.

Other dishes to try at No. 9 Park: The menu’s always changing, but keep an eye out for a dish featuring Rohan duck or Berkshire pork

If you like this, also try: other classic Boston-area pasta dishes, such as lobster ravioli at Rino’s in East Boston, chitarra at Gran Gusto in Cambridge, and squid ink aglio olio at the Daily Catch in Brookline

Further reading: How Barbara Lynch Built Her Restaurant Empire; The Most Comforting New Pasta Dishes in Boston

9 Park St
Boston, MA

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16. Gene's Chinese Flatbread Cafe: Hand-Pulled Noodles

86 Bedford St, Boston, MA