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Sports fans, some in Celtics jerseys, watch basketball on a huge projection screen and other smaller television screens in a high-ceilinged, clean sports bar.
Banners Kitchen & Tap in Boston’s West End.
Banners Kitchen & Tap

Watch the NBA Finals at Boston’s Best Sports Bars

Here are 18 essential Boston-area sports bars at which to watch Boston teams win even more championships

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Banners Kitchen & Tap in Boston’s West End.
| Banners Kitchen & Tap

For those hoping to watch the Celtics crush the Warriors, plenty of Boston bars and restaurants will be ready and waiting with beer, wings, and televisions.

Here are 18 of the best sports bars in and around the city at which to watch the NBA Finals this year — not to mention football, baseball, hockey, and plenty of other sports year-round. While visiting these spots, pour one out for all the classic local sports bars lost over the course of the pandemic, including McGreevy’s, Lir, the Kinsale, and the Boston location of the Fours.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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WynnBET Sports Bar at Encore Boston Harbor

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The casino has several sports-viewing options, and this is the sportiest, featuring a gigantic video wall and over 70 televisions. There’s a full bar and two food options available onsite: burger chain Shake Shack and Frank & Nick’s, serving panini and brick-oven pizza. The latter is a collaboration between North End restaurateurs Frank DePasquale and Nick Varano.

Parlor Sports

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This bar’s sibling and neighbor, Trina’s Starlite Lounge, has a serious cocktail menu, but at Parlor Sports, it’s all about the beer. Get a pitcher of something light (sports are nothing without light beer) and preferably local. Which is to say, get a pitcher of Night Lite by Everett’s own Night Shift Brewing. Parlor Sports is a popular gathering spot for the Midnight Riders, supporters of the New England Revolution, Greater Boston’s soccer club. Plus, stop by for 11 a.m. Premier League matches on Sundays. But while sports dominate the schedule at Parlor Sports, don’t be surprised to find Jeopardy and the Bachelor on the television, treated with equal reverence.

Crowded interior of a narrow, casual bar with sports bar vibes. A sign on a wall reads Inman Boxing.
Parlor Sports.
Parlor Sports

Banners Kitchen & Tap

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Located at the Hub on Causeway development steps from TD Garden, Banners is a convenient spot to stop by pre- or post-game — and if you want to watch something there, there are ample screens, including one enormous one. (There are also Topgolf Swing Suites onsite.) Banners arrived in 2019 featuring a mostly local tap list and a swanky private dining room.

Sullivan's Tap

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Sullivan’s Tap, which reopened under new ownership in 2019 (with minor tweaks), is the spot at which to drink before and after a Celtics game. Play some pool; drink some cheap domestic beers; soak up the classic dive bar vibes. But eat first — there’s no food.

Exterior of a dive bar on a city street with a large green sign that says Sullivan’s Tap. There’s a Dunkin’ next door.
Sullivan’s Tap.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The Phoenix Landing

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You’ll never walk alone at the Phoenix Landing. This Central Square joint is the home base of LFC Boston, the city’s official Liverpool supporters club. Non-members are welcome on game day, but get there early, otherwise you won’t get in. Order a Carlsberg and settle in.

bright red exterior of a bar with a long white sign that says The Phoenix Landing in blue font
The Phoenix Landing.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

The Point

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The second floor of the Point provides views of the Rose Kennedy Greenway and Haymarket Square. The historic flatiron-style building is always showing one Boston sporting event or another. Its menu also includes a number of very solid New England-style seafood options.

A red brick flat-iron building five stories tall on a city street. Neon signage reading Oyster House is visible on a different building in the background.
The Point.
The Point

Kings Dining & Entertainment

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The Seaport location of the Kings chain is equipped with massive HD televisions and a bowling alley; it’s a fine place to watch the Super Bowl or another game while drinking big neon cocktails. Find other Massachusetts locations in Boston’s Back Bay, Burlington, Dedham, and Lynnfield.

Kings Seaport.
Sarah Storrer/Eater

Tony C’s

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The Fenway location closed in late 2019, but the Seaport location of Tony C’s — named for Red Sox great Tony Conigliaro — has a billion televisions (40, to be exact, plus a video wall) and a surprisingly good beer list. Also find locations in Somerville, Peabody, and Burlington.

Porter Belly's Pub

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Porter Belly’s has solid food and live music, and it stays open until at least midnight all week long (1 a.m. Friday through Sunday). It’s also a good spot to watch Six Nations rugby and any and all soccer. It’s one of the city’s very best Irish pubs.

Light brick exterior of a bar with black signage that readers Porter Belly’s in gold on black
Porter Belly’s.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Cask 'n Flagon

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The Cask, a classic Fenway-adjacent sports bar, is where everyone goes to get loose before Red Sox games because beers are prohibitively expensive at Fenway Park. There’s a location out in Marshfield, too.

Exterior of a bar with green and beige accents and a large red sign reading Cask ‘n Flagon. A large banner for Fenway Park is stretched across the adjacent street.
Cask ‘n Flagon.
Cask ‘n Flagon

Bleacher Bar

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Bleacher Bar is literally located underneath the centerfield bleachers in Fenway Park, just beneath the famous red seat, which marks the spot of the 502-foot home run Ted Williams hit during the 1946 season. The bar has a window cut out so patrons can see the field (it closes during the game, sadly.) The bar occupies space once used for the away team’s batting cage, so drinkers can sip on a beer where Brooks Robinson used to take warm-up cuts. Fan of the Buffalo Bills or Sabres? This is your spot.

Interior of a bar with green walls. A large window looks out onto an empty baseball stadium on a sunny day.
Bleacher Bar looks right out onto Fenway Park.
Bleacher Bar

The Sporting Club

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For those wanting to watch sports in an upscale hotel bar, perhaps while sipping an espresso martini, this newcomer is the one. (The hotel’s website calls the Sporting Club “an illustrious sanctuary ... for tastemakers, urbanites, and sports enthusiasts,” so that’s on you to decide if that’s your vibe.) There are a few different seating areas, including the Club Room, which has a dozen televisions. For food, nibble on dishes like oysters, queso fundido, steak frites, and lobster mac and cheese.

An empty sports bar in an upscale hotel features a long, curved wall of large television screens.
The Sporting Club.
Omni Boston Hotel at the Seaport

Game On

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Game On has cornhole sets and ping-pong tables and space for 650 drinkers. It’s a lot. But it’s a solid option for a pre- or post-Sox beer or three.

Coolidge Corner Clubhouse

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This Coolidge Corner haunt feels out of place in the neighborhood — and that’s why it’s so perfect. Each wall is a tribute to one Boston sports team or another, and there’s plenty of cheap beer on tap. A more perfect sports bar doesn’t exist.

Cathedral Station

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Cathedral Station is Boston’s only combination gay bar/sports bar, and it is excellent. Grab a bite at Myers & Chang, then scoot across Washington Street to Cathedral Station for some beers and some sports. There’s free pool and darts, a patio, and — a South End rarity — free parking in the back.

Stats Bar & Grille

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Until pretty recently, South Boston tended more toward well-worn sports bars; at a little over a decade old, Stats is relatively shiny and new in the grand scheme of things. Even for those who long for Southie bars of the past, this is a good destination filled with plenty of televisions (24) showing plenty of sporting events.

The Banshee

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The Banshee is the best spot in Dorchester for soccer and rugby. Head there on a Saturday or Sunday morning and watch as American wunderkind Christian Pulisic makes his mark at Chelsea. The pub is home to quite a few supporters groups for several soccer leagues, plus local Green Bay Packers fans.

The Fours

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Named for Bobby Orr, the Fours is the quintessential Bruins bar. The Boston location closed in 2020 after over 40 years in business, so Bruins fans can’t hop right over before or after a game at the Garden anymore, but Quincy and Norwell locations remain in business. The Fours Quincy has been open since 1994, packed with sports memorabilia and serving an extensive New England-y comfort food menu, from steak tips to baked scrod.

WynnBET Sports Bar at Encore Boston Harbor

The casino has several sports-viewing options, and this is the sportiest, featuring a gigantic video wall and over 70 televisions. There’s a full bar and two food options available onsite: burger chain Shake Shack and Frank & Nick’s, serving panini and brick-oven pizza. The latter is a collaboration between North End restaurateurs Frank DePasquale and Nick Varano.

Parlor Sports

Crowded interior of a narrow, casual bar with sports bar vibes. A sign on a wall reads Inman Boxing.
Parlor Sports.
Parlor Sports

This bar’s sibling and neighbor, Trina’s Starlite Lounge, has a serious cocktail menu, but at Parlor Sports, it’s all about the beer. Get a pitcher of something light (sports are nothing without light beer) and preferably local. Which is to say, get a pitcher of Night Lite by Everett’s own Night Shift Brewing. Parlor Sports is a popular gathering spot for the Midnight Riders, supporters of the New England Revolution, Greater Boston’s soccer club. Plus, stop by for 11 a.m. Premier League matches on Sundays. But while sports dominate the schedule at Parlor Sports, don’t be surprised to find Jeopardy and the Bachelor on the television, treated with equal reverence.

Crowded interior of a narrow, casual bar with sports bar vibes. A sign on a wall reads Inman Boxing.
Parlor Sports.
Parlor Sports

Banners Kitchen & Tap

Located at the Hub on Causeway development steps from TD Garden, Banners is a convenient spot to stop by pre- or post-game — and if you want to watch something there, there are ample screens, including one enormous one. (There are also Topgolf Swing Suites onsite.) Banners arrived in 2019 featuring a mostly local tap list and a swanky private dining room.

Sullivan's Tap

Exterior of a dive bar on a city street with a large green sign that says Sullivan’s Tap. There’s a Dunkin’ next door.
Sullivan’s Tap.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Sullivan’s Tap, which reopened under new ownership in 2019 (with minor tweaks), is the spot at which to drink before and after a Celtics game. Play some pool; drink some cheap domestic beers; soak up the classic dive bar vibes. But eat first — there’s no food.

Exterior of a dive bar on a city street with a large green sign that says Sullivan’s Tap. There’s a Dunkin’ next door.
Sullivan’s Tap.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The Phoenix Landing

bright red exterior of a bar with a long white sign that says The Phoenix Landing in blue font
The Phoenix Landing.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

You’ll never walk alone at the Phoenix Landing. This Central Square joint is the home base of LFC Boston, the city’s official Liverpool supporters club. Non-members are welcome on game day, but get there early, otherwise you won’t get in. Order a Carlsberg and settle in.

bright red exterior of a bar with a long white sign that says The Phoenix Landing in blue font
The Phoenix Landing.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

The Point

A red brick flat-iron building five stories tall on a city street. Neon signage reading Oyster House is visible on a different building in the background.
The Point.
The Point

The second floor of the Point provides views of the Rose Kennedy Greenway and Haymarket Square. The historic flatiron-style building is always showing one Boston sporting event or another. Its menu also includes a number of very solid New England-style seafood options.

A red brick flat-iron building five stories tall on a city street. Neon signage reading Oyster House is visible on a different building in the background.
The Point.
The Point

Kings Dining & Entertainment

Kings Seaport.
Sarah Storrer/Eater

The Seaport location of the Kings chain is equipped with massive HD televisions and a bowling alley; it’s a fine place to watch the Super Bowl or another game while drinking big neon cocktails. Find other Massachusetts locations in Boston’s Back Bay, Burlington, Dedham, and Lynnfield.

Kings Seaport.
Sarah Storrer/Eater

Tony C’s

The Fenway location closed in late 2019, but the Seaport location of Tony C’s — named for Red Sox great Tony Conigliaro — has a billion televisions (40, to be exact, plus a video wall) and a surprisingly good beer list. Also find locations in Somerville, Peabody, and Burlington.

Porter Belly's Pub

Light brick exterior of a bar with black signage that readers Porter Belly’s in gold on black
Porter Belly’s.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Porter Belly’s has solid food and live music, and it stays open until at least midnight all week long (1 a.m. Friday through Sunday). It’s also a good spot to watch Six Nations rugby and any and all soccer. It’s one of the city’s very best Irish pubs.

Light brick exterior of a bar with black signage that readers Porter Belly’s in gold on black
Porter Belly’s.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Cask 'n Flagon

Exterior of a bar with green and beige accents and a large red sign reading Cask ‘n Flagon. A large banner for Fenway Park is stretched across the adjacent street.
Cask ‘n Flagon.
Cask ‘n Flagon

The Cask, a classic Fenway-adjacent sports bar, is where everyone goes to get loose before Red Sox games because beers are prohibitively expensive at Fenway Park. There’s a location out in Marshfield, too.

Exterior of a bar with green and beige accents and a large red sign reading Cask ‘n Flagon. A large banner for Fenway Park is stretched across the adjacent street.
Cask ‘n Flagon.
Cask ‘n Flagon

Bleacher Bar

Interior of a bar with green walls. A large window looks out onto an empty baseball stadium on a sunny day.
Bleacher Bar looks right out onto Fenway Park.
Bleacher Bar

Bleacher Bar is literally located underneath the centerfield bleachers in Fenway Park, just beneath the famous red seat, which marks the spot of the 502-foot home run Ted Williams hit during the 1946 season. The bar has a window cut out so patrons can see the field (it closes during the game, sadly.) The bar occupies space once used for the away team’s batting cage, so drinkers can sip on a beer where Brooks Robinson used to take warm-up cuts. Fan of the Buffalo Bills or Sabres? This is your spot.

Interior of a bar with green walls. A large window looks out onto an empty baseball stadium on a sunny day.
Bleacher Bar looks right out onto Fenway Park.
Bleacher Bar

The Sporting Club

An empty sports bar in an upscale hotel features a long, curved wall of large television screens.
The Sporting Club.
Omni Boston Hotel at the Seaport

For those wanting to watch sports in an upscale hotel bar, perhaps while sipping an espresso martini, this newcomer is the one. (The hotel’s website calls the Sporting Club “an illustrious sanctuary ... for tastemakers, urbanites, and sports enthusiasts,” so that’s on you to decide if that’s your vibe.) There are a few different seating areas, including the Club Room, which has a dozen televisions. For food, nibble on dishes like oysters, queso fundido, steak frites, and lobster mac and cheese.

An empty sports bar in an upscale hotel features a long, curved wall of large television screens.
The Sporting Club.
Omni Boston Hotel at the Seaport

Game On

Game On has cornhole sets and ping-pong tables and space for 650 drinkers. It’s a lot. But it’s a solid option for a pre- or post-Sox beer or three.

Coolidge Corner Clubhouse

This Coolidge Corner haunt feels out of place in the neighborhood — and that’s why it’s so perfect. Each wall is a tribute to one Boston sports team or another, and there’s plenty of cheap beer on tap. A more perfect sports bar doesn’t exist.

Cathedral Station

Cathedral Station is Boston’s only combination gay bar/sports bar, and it is excellent. Grab a bite at Myers & Chang, then scoot across Washington Street to Cathedral Station for some beers and some sports. There’s free pool and darts, a patio, and — a South End rarity — free parking in the back.

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Stats Bar & Grille

Until pretty recently, South Boston tended more toward well-worn sports bars; at a little over a decade old, Stats is relatively shiny and new in the grand scheme of things. Even for those who long for Southie bars of the past, this is a good destination filled with plenty of televisions (24) showing plenty of sporting events.

The Banshee

The Banshee is the best spot in Dorchester for soccer and rugby. Head there on a Saturday or Sunday morning and watch as American wunderkind Christian Pulisic makes his mark at Chelsea. The pub is home to quite a few supporters groups for several soccer leagues, plus local Green Bay Packers fans.

The Fours

Named for Bobby Orr, the Fours is the quintessential Bruins bar. The Boston location closed in 2020 after over 40 years in business, so Bruins fans can’t hop right over before or after a game at the Garden anymore, but Quincy and Norwell locations remain in business. The Fours Quincy has been open since 1994, packed with sports memorabilia and serving an extensive New England-y comfort food menu, from steak tips to baked scrod.

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