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A large steak sliced up and arranged on an oval white plate, with a steak knife balanced on the side of the dish.
A tomahawk steak at Prima in Charlestown.
Assembly Design Studio/Prima Italian Steakhouse

14 Spectacular Boston Steakhouses

Where to eat steaks, chops, and creamed spinach around town

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A tomahawk steak at Prima in Charlestown.
| Assembly Design Studio/Prima Italian Steakhouse

When it comes to fancy steakhouses, Boston delivers. Mostly large chains, to be sure, but there are a couple of independent spots and smaller local restaurant groups as well. Here are 14 of the best steakhouses for those martini-power-lunch days or the fancy nights when you want to feast on dry-aged chops, mashed potatoes, and chocolate cake.

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Rare Steakhouse

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Rare Steakhouse — located inside Encore’s luxury resort and casino — is a perfect place to take those casino winnings after a particularly lucky afternoon. There are lots of opportunities to go big here, including the wagyu tartare, a colossal shrimp cocktail, and the 40-ounce dry-aged tomahawk. For a more low-key meal or an after-dinner nightcap, head to the next-door Rare Lounge.

Oliveira's

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For an excellent Brazilian steakhouse experience without the downtown crowds, head to Oliveira’s in East Boston for juicy, barbecued meats by the pound and brigadeiros — round, bite-sized chocolate treats — for dessert.

Prima Italian Steakhouse

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Prima debuted in the former home of once-famed Boston restaurant Olives in the summer of 2023, determined to put the storied address back on the map. The menu boasts an in-house cheese program, steaks of all sizes, and excellent pasta plates like the spicy picci, a chewy, hand-pulled Italian noodle slicked in cream and n’duja. It’s a happening spot to see and be seen — if you can get a table.

Upscale local chain Mooo (from the team behind Back Bay bistro Mistral, Italian spot Sorellina, and more) has all the steakhouse classics — filets, ribeyes, sirloins, steamed asparagus, creamed spinach; you get the point — but it also offers the trappings of a more-modern chophouse, such as wagyu beef in steak and dumpling form and an extensive seafood section. Go for the steak; stay for the yellowfin tuna tartare. In addition to this Beacon Hill original, find Mooo locations in the Seaport and Burlington.

Ruth's Chris Steak House

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The Boston outpost of chain steakhouse Ruth’s Chris is in the Old City Hall building on School Street downtown. Private diners can even eat their steaks in the Old City Hall’s original vault, which is over 150 years old. What wonders — and secrets — were kept therein?

The Stockyard

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The Stockyard is a time capsule. It looks like a 1970s steakhouse because it is a 1970s steakhouse. Everything on the menu is worth ordering, including the burger, but the steak tips are particularly good and particularly Boston.

Bogie's Place

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Bogie’s Place is a steakhouse hidden inside JM Curley, serving filets, bone-in ribeyes, and a 28-ounce tomahawk. Try the smashed potatoes cooked in duck fat and the roasted mushrooms, and order an excellent cocktail from the bar.

Boston Chops

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Either location — the South End or the Downtown Crossing outpost — of Boston Chops will do. Get the crab cakes and the oxtail croquettes, and share the chateaubriand among friends. If steak isn’t your thing, Boston Chops has an extensive menu featuring pork, fish, and chicken. Also: a giant tower of onion rings.

A wide shot of Boston Chops DTX, looking down the length of the restaurant and towards the front door, with elegant light fixtures and a long bar in view.
The downtown location of Boston Chops.
Sarah Storrer/Eater Boston

Smith & Wollensky

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This decades-old steakhouse may no longer operate within Back Bay’s Castle, but Smith & Wollensky still holds down the meat fort near Fort Point Channel with an assortment of dry-aged cuts, fancy filets, and ribeye.

Davio's Northern Italian Steakhouse

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Davio’s isn’t strictly a steakhouse — indeed, it’s more an Italian-slash-seafood restaurant than anything — but the menu at both its Back Bay and Seaport locations features a formidable list of steaks, including wagyu, short ribs, and aged ribeye. Based locally, the small chain has expanded across the country.

Grill 23 & Bar

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Back Bay institution Grill 23 has been doing the steakhouse thing for 40 years, and prides itself on maintaining a remarkably deep wine list. Go with friends, get some apps — a classic wedge salad, some crab cakes — and maybe a 32-ounce porterhouse to share. For those who aren’t into red meat, Grill 23 has a variety of chicken, fish, and vegetarian options.

The bar at Grill 23, featuring marble columns, brown chairs, and light accents.
The bar at Grill 23.
Chris Coe/Eater Boston

Abe & Louie's

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The first Abe & Louie’s opened on Boylston Street in Boston more than two decades ago, and it has become a stalwart of the power-lunch scene. (A second spot has since sprouted in Boca Raton, Florida.) Go for classic chops and the likes of crabmeat cocktails, a half-dozen oysters, and lobster dumplings from the appetizer and raw-bar menus.

An interior shot of Abe & Louie’s, including dark wooden walls, a mural of a jazz band, and a number of four-tops covered in white tablecloths.
Abe & Louie’s.
Abe & Louie’s

The Capital Grille

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The Capital Grille, which has restaurants all over the country (including two others in the Boston area), is a reliable choice. All the usual suspects are here, from the filets and ribeyes to the creamed spinach, plus creme brulee and a decadent flourless chocolate espresso cake for dessert.

Sofia Italian Steakhouse

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Like Davio’s and Prima, Sofia strikes a successful balance between Italian pasta shop and steakhouse. At the West Roxbury mainstay, find braised short rib pappardelle and shrimp and scallop scampi alongside double-cut lamb chops, prime ribs, and a relatively affordable wine bottle selection.

Rare Steakhouse

Rare Steakhouse — located inside Encore’s luxury resort and casino — is a perfect place to take those casino winnings after a particularly lucky afternoon. There are lots of opportunities to go big here, including the wagyu tartare, a colossal shrimp cocktail, and the 40-ounce dry-aged tomahawk. For a more low-key meal or an after-dinner nightcap, head to the next-door Rare Lounge.

Oliveira's

For an excellent Brazilian steakhouse experience without the downtown crowds, head to Oliveira’s in East Boston for juicy, barbecued meats by the pound and brigadeiros — round, bite-sized chocolate treats — for dessert.

Prima Italian Steakhouse

Prima debuted in the former home of once-famed Boston restaurant Olives in the summer of 2023, determined to put the storied address back on the map. The menu boasts an in-house cheese program, steaks of all sizes, and excellent pasta plates like the spicy picci, a chewy, hand-pulled Italian noodle slicked in cream and n’duja. It’s a happening spot to see and be seen — if you can get a table.

Mooo

Upscale local chain Mooo (from the team behind Back Bay bistro Mistral, Italian spot Sorellina, and more) has all the steakhouse classics — filets, ribeyes, sirloins, steamed asparagus, creamed spinach; you get the point — but it also offers the trappings of a more-modern chophouse, such as wagyu beef in steak and dumpling form and an extensive seafood section. Go for the steak; stay for the yellowfin tuna tartare. In addition to this Beacon Hill original, find Mooo locations in the Seaport and Burlington.

Ruth's Chris Steak House

The Boston outpost of chain steakhouse Ruth’s Chris is in the Old City Hall building on School Street downtown. Private diners can even eat their steaks in the Old City Hall’s original vault, which is over 150 years old. What wonders — and secrets — were kept therein?

The Stockyard

The Stockyard is a time capsule. It looks like a 1970s steakhouse because it is a 1970s steakhouse. Everything on the menu is worth ordering, including the burger, but the steak tips are particularly good and particularly Boston.

Bogie's Place

Bogie’s Place is a steakhouse hidden inside JM Curley, serving filets, bone-in ribeyes, and a 28-ounce tomahawk. Try the smashed potatoes cooked in duck fat and the roasted mushrooms, and order an excellent cocktail from the bar.

Boston Chops

Either location — the South End or the Downtown Crossing outpost — of Boston Chops will do. Get the crab cakes and the oxtail croquettes, and share the chateaubriand among friends. If steak isn’t your thing, Boston Chops has an extensive menu featuring pork, fish, and chicken. Also: a giant tower of onion rings.

A wide shot of Boston Chops DTX, looking down the length of the restaurant and towards the front door, with elegant light fixtures and a long bar in view.
The downtown location of Boston Chops.
Sarah Storrer/Eater Boston

Smith & Wollensky

This decades-old steakhouse may no longer operate within Back Bay’s Castle, but Smith & Wollensky still holds down the meat fort near Fort Point Channel with an assortment of dry-aged cuts, fancy filets, and ribeye.

Davio's Northern Italian Steakhouse

Davio’s isn’t strictly a steakhouse — indeed, it’s more an Italian-slash-seafood restaurant than anything — but the menu at both its Back Bay and Seaport locations features a formidable list of steaks, including wagyu, short ribs, and aged ribeye. Based locally, the small chain has expanded across the country.

Grill 23 & Bar

Back Bay institution Grill 23 has been doing the steakhouse thing for 40 years, and prides itself on maintaining a remarkably deep wine list. Go with friends, get some apps — a classic wedge salad, some crab cakes — and maybe a 32-ounce porterhouse to share. For those who aren’t into red meat, Grill 23 has a variety of chicken, fish, and vegetarian options.

The bar at Grill 23, featuring marble columns, brown chairs, and light accents.
The bar at Grill 23.
Chris Coe/Eater Boston

Abe & Louie's

The first Abe & Louie’s opened on Boylston Street in Boston more than two decades ago, and it has become a stalwart of the power-lunch scene. (A second spot has since sprouted in Boca Raton, Florida.) Go for classic chops and the likes of crabmeat cocktails, a half-dozen oysters, and lobster dumplings from the appetizer and raw-bar menus.

An interior shot of Abe & Louie’s, including dark wooden walls, a mural of a jazz band, and a number of four-tops covered in white tablecloths.
Abe & Louie’s.
Abe & Louie’s

The Capital Grille

The Capital Grille, which has restaurants all over the country (including two others in the Boston area), is a reliable choice. All the usual suspects are here, from the filets and ribeyes to the creamed spinach, plus creme brulee and a decadent flourless chocolate espresso cake for dessert.

Sofia Italian Steakhouse

Like Davio’s and Prima, Sofia strikes a successful balance between Italian pasta shop and steakhouse. At the West Roxbury mainstay, find braised short rib pappardelle and shrimp and scallop scampi alongside double-cut lamb chops, prime ribs, and a relatively affordable wine bottle selection.

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