clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A plate with a blue border embellished by birds holds a portion of lobster with scallions and ginger
Lobster with scallions and ginger at Peach Farm in Chinatown.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Where to Eat in Boston’s Chinatown

The neighborhood’s best restaurants for dumplings and dim sum and noodles and sushi and so much more

View as Map
Lobster with scallions and ginger at Peach Farm in Chinatown.
| Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Chinatown is, without a doubt, one of Boston’s best food neighborhoods. Want to eat the greatest dumplings in the city? Head to Chinatown. Dim sum? Check. Offal? Check. Peking duck? You got it. Chinatown has ramen; Chinatown has udon; Chinatown has sushi; Chinatown has pho; Chinatown has hot pot. Chinatown is where you bring your friend who’s visiting from out of town and wants to eat the best food the city has to offer.

It’s a dense, food-packed neighborhood to explore, but start with these 16 excellent options.

See also: Great Bakeries in Boston’s Chinatown

For all the latest Boston dining intel, subscribe to Eater Boston’s newsletter.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The menu at the Q is massive and offers diners a mix of Japanese and Chinese food, but the play here is the Mongolian hot pot. Get the spicy beef tallow broth, and pack it with noodles, vegetables, and protein.

A restaurant interior full of diners. The space features brick and bright red accents.
The Q in Chinatown.
The Q

Avana Sushi

Copy Link

This sushi spot lives inside a cramped food court on Beach Street and offers diners a ludicrously cheap lunch deal, which includes miso soup, one maki roll, and two sides. There’s also a larger location in the Financial District (58 Franklin St.) that opened more recently, but there’s something special about the weird little Beach Street location.

Taiwan Cafe

Copy Link

The Taiwan-style pan-fried dumplings at Taiwan Cafe are the truth, but don’t shy away from dishes such as sauteed pickled mustard greens with pork intestines, sauteed blood pudding, or Sichuan-style white fish in a pot of bubbling chile oil.

Slices of a flaky white fish sit in a fiery red broth in a metal bowl over a flame. It’s on a table inside a busy, casual restaurant.
Sichuan fish at Taiwan Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Pho Pasteur

Copy Link

This Vietnamese restaurant is a Chinatown staple. Pho Pasteur opened in 1991, and it has been serving an extensive menu of Vietnamese food — including, yes, some of the best pho in the city — ever since.

Exterior of Pho Pasteur Vietnamese restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown, with maroon signage and light pink paint.
Pho Pasteur.
Pho Pasteur

Penang Malaysian Cuisine

Copy Link

The roti canai is a sort of crispy pancake served with curry chicken, and it — along with the nasi lemak, which is a coconut-flavored rice dish served with a chile- and anchovy-spiked curry chicken and a hard-boiled egg — is what you should order at Penang, one of the area’s only Malaysian restaurants. (There’s also a Waltham location.)

A Malaysian fish — curry chicken, rice, and a hard-boiled egg — on a banana leaf on a blue plate
Nasi lemak at Penang.
Dippy_Duck/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Empire Garden

Copy Link

This eye-catching space was formerly a Vaudeville theater. (And no, it wasn’t a porn theater.) Peking duck is an option, making Empire Garden one of the very few restaurants in the city doing the dish.

The facade of Empire Garden restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown. The sign is red with yellow lettering. The building looks like an old theater, because it was once a theater.
Empire Garden promises “exotic cocktails,” “Chinese delicacies,” and more.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Hot Pot Buffet

Copy Link

Hot Pot Buffet serves all-you-can-eat hot pot until late — what more does anyone need? Fans love the quick service and extensive menu.

Signage for Hot Pot Buffet in Boston’s Chinatown — red text on a white background, with an image of a cartoonish smiling bull giving a thumbs up
Hot Pot Buffet.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Dumpling Cafe

Copy Link

Dumpling Cafe is the spot for Taiwan-style pan-fried dumplings and pork soup dumplings. Not to be missed, however, is the Taiwan-style eggplant, which is sweet and spicy and gooey and perfect. (Not in Chinatown but trying to satisfy a dumpling craving? Try Dumpling Cafe’s sibling restaurants Dumpling Kingdom and Dumpling Palace, located in Allston and Fenway, respectively.)

A wooden steamer holds half a dozen plump soup dumplings. The steamer sits on a round white plate on a wooden table.
Soup dumplings at Dumpling Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Peach Farm

Copy Link

Peach Farm was a late-night favorite among restaurant industry types before the pandemic struck, but it doesn’t stay open quite as late anymore. Still, it’s worth a visit. Its menu is overwhelming — there are literally hundreds of options — but that’s part of the allure. One could eat food from Peach Farm every night for a year before trying everything on the menu, but start with seafood, especially the lobster with ginger and scallions. There’s also Peking duck, and — unlike other neighborhood destinations for it — you don’t have to order in advance.

A plate with a blue border embellished by birds holds a portion of lobster with scallions and ginger
Lobster with scallions and ginger at Peach Farm.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This extraordinarily hip spot is known for its inspired cocktails, but don’t miss the sesame charred greens, the tiger-style ribs, the shadowless fries, and whatever bao options are currently on offer.

A burger served on a steamed bun and topped with a kimchi cheese and bacon
The “Shojonator” burger at Shojo.
Shojo

Hong Kong Eatery

Copy Link

This Cantonese restaurant has been open since the 1980s and has since become a stalwart of Chinatown’s dining scene. The sauteed duck tongues in Maggi sauce are worth an order, as is anything made with XO sauce, which is a spicy, umami-rich fish sauce that originated in Hong Kong.

A white plate with a blue floral pattern around the edge holds a Chinese beef and rice dish
Beef in Beijing sauce at Hong Kong Eatery.
Herman Saksono/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Winsor Dim Sum Cafe

Copy Link

Winsor Dim Sum Cafe’s dim sum menu is expansive. The restaurant also serves great congee, and its shredded pig ears in mala sauce are not to be missed.

A spread of dim sum dishes, including several dumplings
A dim sum spread at Winsor Dim Sum Cafe.
Sang-Min Yoon/Flickr (Creative Commons)

New Jumbo Seafood

Copy Link

New Jumbo Seafood obviously has its fair share of seafood options, but it also serves deep-fried quail, roasted pigeon, and Peking duck.

Signage for New Jumbo Seafood Restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown — raised red lettering on a gold background
New Jumbo Seafood Restaurant.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Irashai

Copy Link

This Japanese spot has an extensive menu, including sushi, sashimi, maki, and a variety of teriyaki options. The pork katsu — which is fried pork cutlet — and some sushi is the play.

A plate of sushi, including pieces of salmon, a roll, and more
Sushi at Irashai.
Irashai

Shabu Zen

Copy Link

Shabu Zen is one of the city’s best hot pot spots (there’s also a location in Allston), and it’s been around for 20 years. Splurge and get the prime ribeye, and pair it with the Mongolian-style spicy broth.

A bowl of clams in broth at a hot pot restaurant
Clams at Shabu Zen.
Korsha Wilson/Eater

Tora Japanese Restaurant

Copy Link

One of several excellent Japanese options in a neighborhood more focused around Chinese food, the subterranean Tora opened in late 2017, featuring kaisen don — rice bowls with sashimi — and describing itself as the first local restaurant to do so. There’s also makimono, poke, hot entrees (such as broiled teriyaki eel over rice), and more.

A bowl of raw seafood, including salmon and salmon roe, on rice, served on a wooden tray with miso soup
The Tokyo don, plus extra salmon, at Tora Japanese Restaurant in Chinatown.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The Q

A restaurant interior full of diners. The space features brick and bright red accents.
The Q in Chinatown.
The Q

The menu at the Q is massive and offers diners a mix of Japanese and Chinese food, but the play here is the Mongolian hot pot. Get the spicy beef tallow broth, and pack it with noodles, vegetables, and protein.

A restaurant interior full of diners. The space features brick and bright red accents.
The Q in Chinatown.
The Q

Avana Sushi

This sushi spot lives inside a cramped food court on Beach Street and offers diners a ludicrously cheap lunch deal, which includes miso soup, one maki roll, and two sides. There’s also a larger location in the Financial District (58 Franklin St.) that opened more recently, but there’s something special about the weird little Beach Street location.

Taiwan Cafe

Slices of a flaky white fish sit in a fiery red broth in a metal bowl over a flame. It’s on a table inside a busy, casual restaurant.
Sichuan fish at Taiwan Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The Taiwan-style pan-fried dumplings at Taiwan Cafe are the truth, but don’t shy away from dishes such as sauteed pickled mustard greens with pork intestines, sauteed blood pudding, or Sichuan-style white fish in a pot of bubbling chile oil.

Slices of a flaky white fish sit in a fiery red broth in a metal bowl over a flame. It’s on a table inside a busy, casual restaurant.
Sichuan fish at Taiwan Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Pho Pasteur

Exterior of Pho Pasteur Vietnamese restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown, with maroon signage and light pink paint.
Pho Pasteur.
Pho Pasteur

This Vietnamese restaurant is a Chinatown staple. Pho Pasteur opened in 1991, and it has been serving an extensive menu of Vietnamese food — including, yes, some of the best pho in the city — ever since.

Exterior of Pho Pasteur Vietnamese restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown, with maroon signage and light pink paint.
Pho Pasteur.
Pho Pasteur

Penang Malaysian Cuisine

A Malaysian fish — curry chicken, rice, and a hard-boiled egg — on a banana leaf on a blue plate
Nasi lemak at Penang.
Dippy_Duck/Flickr (Creative Commons)

The roti canai is a sort of crispy pancake served with curry chicken, and it — along with the nasi lemak, which is a coconut-flavored rice dish served with a chile- and anchovy-spiked curry chicken and a hard-boiled egg — is what you should order at Penang, one of the area’s only Malaysian restaurants. (There’s also a Waltham location.)

A Malaysian fish — curry chicken, rice, and a hard-boiled egg — on a banana leaf on a blue plate
Nasi lemak at Penang.
Dippy_Duck/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Empire Garden

The facade of Empire Garden restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown. The sign is red with yellow lettering. The building looks like an old theater, because it was once a theater.
Empire Garden promises “exotic cocktails,” “Chinese delicacies,” and more.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

This eye-catching space was formerly a Vaudeville theater. (And no, it wasn’t a porn theater.) Peking duck is an option, making Empire Garden one of the very few restaurants in the city doing the dish.

The facade of Empire Garden restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown. The sign is red with yellow lettering. The building looks like an old theater, because it was once a theater.
Empire Garden promises “exotic cocktails,” “Chinese delicacies,” and more.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Hot Pot Buffet

Signage for Hot Pot Buffet in Boston’s Chinatown — red text on a white background, with an image of a cartoonish smiling bull giving a thumbs up
Hot Pot Buffet.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Hot Pot Buffet serves all-you-can-eat hot pot until late — what more does anyone need? Fans love the quick service and extensive menu.

Signage for Hot Pot Buffet in Boston’s Chinatown — red text on a white background, with an image of a cartoonish smiling bull giving a thumbs up
Hot Pot Buffet.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Dumpling Cafe

A wooden steamer holds half a dozen plump soup dumplings. The steamer sits on a round white plate on a wooden table.
Soup dumplings at Dumpling Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Dumpling Cafe is the spot for Taiwan-style pan-fried dumplings and pork soup dumplings. Not to be missed, however, is the Taiwan-style eggplant, which is sweet and spicy and gooey and perfect. (Not in Chinatown but trying to satisfy a dumpling craving? Try Dumpling Cafe’s sibling restaurants Dumpling Kingdom and Dumpling Palace, located in Allston and Fenway, respectively.)

A wooden steamer holds half a dozen plump soup dumplings. The steamer sits on a round white plate on a wooden table.
Soup dumplings at Dumpling Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Peach Farm

A plate with a blue border embellished by birds holds a portion of lobster with scallions and ginger
Lobster with scallions and ginger at Peach Farm.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Peach Farm was a late-night favorite among restaurant industry types before the pandemic struck, but it doesn’t stay open quite as late anymore. Still, it’s worth a visit. Its menu is overwhelming — there are literally hundreds of options — but that’s part of the allure. One could eat food from Peach Farm every night for a year before trying everything on the menu, but start with seafood, especially the lobster with ginger and scallions. There’s also Peking duck, and — unlike other neighborhood destinations for it — you don’t have to order in advance.

A plate with a blue border embellished by birds holds a portion of lobster with scallions and ginger
Lobster with scallions and ginger at Peach Farm.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Shojo

A burger served on a steamed bun and topped with a kimchi cheese and bacon
The “Shojonator” burger at Shojo.
Shojo

This extraordinarily hip spot is known for its inspired cocktails, but don’t miss the sesame charred greens, the tiger-style ribs, the shadowless fries, and whatever bao options are currently on offer.

A burger served on a steamed bun and topped with a kimchi cheese and bacon
The “Shojonator” burger at Shojo.
Shojo

Hong Kong Eatery

A white plate with a blue floral pattern around the edge holds a Chinese beef and rice dish
Beef in Beijing sauce at Hong Kong Eatery.
Herman Saksono/Flickr (Creative Commons)

This Cantonese restaurant has been open since the 1980s and has since become a stalwart of Chinatown’s dining scene. The sauteed duck tongues in Maggi sauce are worth an order, as is anything made with XO sauce, which is a spicy, umami-rich fish sauce that originated in Hong Kong.

A white plate with a blue floral pattern around the edge holds a Chinese beef and rice dish
Beef in Beijing sauce at Hong Kong Eatery.
Herman Saksono/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Winsor Dim Sum Cafe

A spread of dim sum dishes, including several dumplings
A dim sum spread at Winsor Dim Sum Cafe.
Sang-Min Yoon/Flickr (Creative Commons)

Winsor Dim Sum Cafe’s dim sum menu is expansive. The restaurant also serves great congee, and its shredded pig ears in mala sauce are not to be missed.

A spread of dim sum dishes, including several dumplings
A dim sum spread at Winsor Dim Sum Cafe.
Sang-Min Yoon/Flickr (Creative Commons)

New Jumbo Seafood

Signage for New Jumbo Seafood Restaurant in Boston’s Chinatown — raised red lettering on a gold background
New Jumbo Seafood Restaurant.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

New Jumbo Seafood obviously has its fair share of seafood options, but it also serves deep-fried quail, roasted pigeon, and Peking duck.