clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Overhead view of eight round dumplings in an aluminum to-go container, sitting in a spicy sauce with sauteed red onions.
Spicy pan-fried momos from Himalayan Kitchen in Somerville, Massachusetts.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Where to Eat Momos in Greater Boston

Prevalent in Tibetan and Nepali cuisines, these delightful dumplings can be found at several local restaurants, steamed or fried and filled with various meats and vegetables

View as Map
Spicy pan-fried momos from Himalayan Kitchen in Somerville, Massachusetts.
| Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Momos, dumplings that are prevalent mostly in Nepali and Tibetan cuisines but not unheard of elsewhere in South Asia, can come in several shapes and types, filled with a variety of meats or vegetables, served steamed or pan-fried, sometimes in soup, sometimes doused in fiery chile sauce.

The Greater Boston area is home to quite a few restaurants that serve some combination of Tibetan, Nepali, and Indian cuisines, and momos are pretty much always on the menu. It’s thanks in part to the Tibet-U.S. resettlement project of 1989, which brought 1,000 Tibetan immigrants who had been living in Nepal or India to the United States over the course of several years. The bill was introduced to Congress by Massachusetts representative Barney Frank, and Boston and Amherst were two of a handful of settlement cities around the country that were part of the project. Several hundred Tibetans came to the Boston area, with some ending up in the restaurant industry, and the rest is history.

Here are 16 Boston-area restaurants where one can try plump, satisfying momos.

See also: Where to Eat Dumplings in and Around Boston

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Zuzu Momo

Copy Link

Zuzu Momo, a 2020 addition to Everett, does plenty of takeout and delivery business, but its fun ambiance also makes for a nice dine-in spot (the full bar doesn’t hurt.) The team’s goal is to mix street food with fine dining, melding “Nepali culture with a quintessential Bostonian vibe.” There’s an extensive menu packed with biryani, curries, wings, and lots more, and there are eight different momo preparations (choose chicken, pork, or vegetable for each) — as well as a bloody mary topped with fried momos, because why not? Go a little fancy with the momo tikka masala or a little simpler and spicier with the new road style c momos, fried momos sauteed with onions, bell pepper, red chile sauce, and Sichuan pepper. Momo lovers can take them home frozen, too, in packs of 25, 50, or 100.

Takeout containers hold fried Nepali dumplings with sauteed peppers and onions, a yellowish rice and chicken dish, and naan.
New road-style momos, chicken biryani, and garlic naan from Zuzu Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Tukure Nepali Cuisine

Copy Link

This tiny counter is tucked away in the back of a small convenience store that specializes in South Asian ingredients. There are a few seats for dining in, but this is primarily a takeout spot; you’ll find a few outdated menus floating around on third-party delivery sites, but your best bet is to just show up in person. You’ll likely find a few types of momos (c, jhol, etc.) and a small selection of other dishes, such as chow mein and choila.

Two round aluminum takeout containers sit side by side, one filled with a chicken and bell pepper dish, the other with momo and bell pepper.
Chicken chile (left) and c momos from Tukure Nepali Cuisine.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This Teele Square restaurant — which features a full bar (including absurdly cheap margaritas) — serves a huge menu that includes Indian and Nepali dishes. Momos come steamed and filled with vegetables or chicken; chile momos are also available.

Eight steamed dumplings sit on a plate, half in an oblong shape and half round.
Momos at Masala.
Masala

Mint Indian Eatery

Copy Link

Despite its name, Somerville’s Mint Indian Eatery, located in Powder House Circle, doesn’t exclusively serve Indian food. It also offers some “Indo-Asian” fusion dishes and a selection of momos, including lamb momos tossed in chile sauce, paneer spinach momos, deep-fried chicken momos, and a few other options. The small counter-service restaurant is mostly geared toward takeout and delivery but does offer a bit of seating inside.

Eight round steamed dumplings sit on a white plate, doused in a fiery bright red sauce and garnished with chopped scallions.
Chile momos from Mint Indian Eatery.
Mint Indian Eatery

Tasty Mo:Mo

Copy Link

The name of Tasty Mo:Mo, a fast-casual Magoun Square spot, gets right to the point; momo lovers will find, yes, plenty of tasty dumplings here, available with beef, chicken, pork, vegan, or aloo (potato) fillings. Get them steamed, pan-fried, deep-fried, in a vegetable-based soup, jhol-style, or chile-style, which packs some serious heat. Chow mein, thukpa (noodle soup), special-occasion sel roti, and a few other items round out the menu.

Closeup shot of a few steamed dumplings in a thick red sauce that looks very spicy. The dumplings are sitting on aluminum foil.
Chile momos at Tasty Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Martsa on Elm

Copy Link

Davis Square staple Martsa on Elm, serving Tibetan food in Somerville for nearly 20 years, moved into a swankier new space a few doors down in late 2020. The full-service restaurant offers beer and wine alongside its lengthy food menu, with the momo selection including beef, chicken, or vegetable filling. They’re served steamed or pan-fried and make for a great starter before digging into Martsa’s curries, noodle dishes, and more. Try the butter tea or ginger honey lime tea for a warming accompaniment.

Bridges Nepali Cuisine

Copy Link

Winthrop restaurant Bridges Nepali Cuisine aims to bridge (get it?) communities “through food, spices, and art.” On the food side, there are chicken or vegetable momos, available steamed (with or without chile sauce), or pan-fried, alongside a variety of other Nepali dishes.

Momo N Curry

Copy Link

This friendly counter-service Union Square restaurant — sibling to Cafe Momo in Manchester, New Hampshire — serves a mix of Indian and Nepali cuisine and offers a bit of seating for dining onsite (with a kettle full of complimentary chai), as well as takeout and delivery. For meat eaters, the buffalo momos are the play here, while vegetarians should try the spinach and paneer, plantain, or vegetable. Chicken, goat, and lamb fillings are also available.

Eight plump round steamed dumplings are nestled in a black plastic takeout bowl with a side of naan.
Steamed buffalo momos and garlic naan from Momo N Curry.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Himalayan Kitchen

Copy Link

Another Union Square spot, the casual Himalayan Kitchen offers a mix of Nepali, Indian, and American dishes, including some fusion — think chicken tikka “naanwiches” and palak paneer pizza. For momos, choose from vegetable, chicken, or pork, served steamed, pan-fried, johl-style, or spicy c-style. The counter-service restaurant is mostly geared toward takeout and delivery, but there’s a little bit of seating (and some nice decor) for dine-in. The lunch specials, served daily, are a solid deal.

Overhead view of eight round dumplings in an aluminum to-go container, sitting in a spicy sauce with sauteed red onions.
Spicy pan-fried momos from Himalayan Kitchen.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Base Crave

Copy Link

Cambridge’s Base Crave, sibling to Mitho in Winchester, leans Nepali with dishes like momos and choila, although the restaurant’s stated cuisine is “fusion gourmet...cuisines from all around the world.” Base Crave serves its momos steamed, with a choice of chicken, vegetable, paneer and spinach, lamb, buffalo, or wild boar filling. (The vegetable filling is vegetarian.)

Eight plump steamed round dumplings sit on an orange plate, circled around a small bowl of a thick orange sauce.
Momos at Base Crave.
Base Crave

Chulo Restaurant & Bar

Copy Link

Over in Watertown, Chulo has been serving Nepali and Indian food since 2017. Named for a traditional Nepali stove made of mud, the restaurant also has a full bar and frequently hosts live music in a variety of genres. Momo lovers will find a few different chicken and vegetable options, including steamed and pan-fried, with or without chile sauce.

Kantipur Cafe

Copy Link

Cambridge’s Kantipur Cafe serves Nepali and Indian cuisine. (When it opened earlier in the pandemic, there were pizzas and subs, too, a nod to the owners’ pizzerias they ran in Michigan before moving to Massachusetts, but the menu has since been simplified.) Chicken or vegetable momos come steamed, pan-fried, jhol-style, chile-style, or charred in the tandoori oven.

Overhead view of an aluminum circular takeout container full of round, slightly charred dumplings. A big round cup of a thick orange drink sits to the side.
Pan-fried momos and a mango lassi from Kantipur Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Rangzen Tibetan Place

Copy Link

Open for over 20 years in Cambridge’s Central Square, Rangzen boasts a large Tibetan menu and cozy dine-in vibes equally suitable for a casual meal with friends or a date night. The restaurant’s momos come steamed with house-made hot sauce and a small soup on the side; fillings include vegetables, chicken, beef, or lamb. Try some butter tea to drink. Take home some frozen momos in a pack of 25 or 50.

Overhead view of several takeout containers with a beef and potato dish and oblong, slightly browned dumplings.
Pan-fried luksha (lamb) momos (right) from Rangzen, with a beef and potato dish and fruit salad.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Trident Booksellers & Cafe

Copy Link

Unlike the other restaurants on this map, Trident isn’t Nepali or Tibetan; it’s a bookstore and cafe serving a sizable American diner-style menu. But vegetarian momos have been periodically offered since way back in 1992, introduced by employee Tsering Wangdi, who became known as the “Momo Man.” They returned to the menu in 2021 when another Tibetan chef joined the kitchen staff. The restaurant’s new “Momo Gal” is using Wangdi’s original recipe. When available, Trident’s momos are served steamed or fried with soy sauce and peanut sauce.

House of Tandoor

Copy Link

Located in Newton Centre, this spacious restaurant and bar offers a mix of Indian and Nepali dishes, including momos. They come steamed and filled with chicken, vegetables, lamb, or plantain — the plantain momos are vegan — and are available in orders of five or 10. Also of note: There’s a brunch buffet on weekends and a lunch buffet during the week.

Himalayan Bistro

Copy Link

Serving a mix of Indian and Nepali food, West Roxbury’s Himalayan Bistro offers steamed momos with vegetable, chicken, lamb, or plantain filling. The latter is vegan. There’s a lunch buffet at Himalayan Bistro, and the restaurant also hosts private events in a function room that fits up to 100.

Zuzu Momo

Takeout containers hold fried Nepali dumplings with sauteed peppers and onions, a yellowish rice and chicken dish, and naan.
New road-style momos, chicken biryani, and garlic naan from Zuzu Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Zuzu Momo, a 2020 addition to Everett, does plenty of takeout and delivery business, but its fun ambiance also makes for a nice dine-in spot (the full bar doesn’t hurt.) The team’s goal is to mix street food with fine dining, melding “Nepali culture with a quintessential Bostonian vibe.” There’s an extensive menu packed with biryani, curries, wings, and lots more, and there are eight different momo preparations (choose chicken, pork, or vegetable for each) — as well as a bloody mary topped with fried momos, because why not? Go a little fancy with the momo tikka masala or a little simpler and spicier with the new road style c momos, fried momos sauteed with onions, bell pepper, red chile sauce, and Sichuan pepper. Momo lovers can take them home frozen, too, in packs of 25, 50, or 100.

Takeout containers hold fried Nepali dumplings with sauteed peppers and onions, a yellowish rice and chicken dish, and naan.
New road-style momos, chicken biryani, and garlic naan from Zuzu Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Tukure Nepali Cuisine

Two round aluminum takeout containers sit side by side, one filled with a chicken and bell pepper dish, the other with momo and bell pepper.
Chicken chile (left) and c momos from Tukure Nepali Cuisine.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This tiny counter is tucked away in the back of a small convenience store that specializes in South Asian ingredients. There are a few seats for dining in, but this is primarily a takeout spot; you’ll find a few outdated menus floating around on third-party delivery sites, but your best bet is to just show up in person. You’ll likely find a few types of momos (c, jhol, etc.) and a small selection of other dishes, such as chow mein and choila.

Two round aluminum takeout containers sit side by side, one filled with a chicken and bell pepper dish, the other with momo and bell pepper.
Chicken chile (left) and c momos from Tukure Nepali Cuisine.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Masala

Eight steamed dumplings sit on a plate, half in an oblong shape and half round.
Momos at Masala.
Masala

This Teele Square restaurant — which features a full bar (including absurdly cheap margaritas) — serves a huge menu that includes Indian and Nepali dishes. Momos come steamed and filled with vegetables or chicken; chile momos are also available.

Eight steamed dumplings sit on a plate, half in an oblong shape and half round.
Momos at Masala.
Masala

Mint Indian Eatery

Eight round steamed dumplings sit on a white plate, doused in a fiery bright red sauce and garnished with chopped scallions.
Chile momos from Mint Indian Eatery.
Mint Indian Eatery

Despite its name, Somerville’s Mint Indian Eatery, located in Powder House Circle, doesn’t exclusively serve Indian food. It also offers some “Indo-Asian” fusion dishes and a selection of momos, including lamb momos tossed in chile sauce, paneer spinach momos, deep-fried chicken momos, and a few other options. The small counter-service restaurant is mostly geared toward takeout and delivery but does offer a bit of seating inside.

Eight round steamed dumplings sit on a white plate, doused in a fiery bright red sauce and garnished with chopped scallions.
Chile momos from Mint Indian Eatery.
Mint Indian Eatery

Tasty Mo:Mo

Closeup shot of a few steamed dumplings in a thick red sauce that looks very spicy. The dumplings are sitting on aluminum foil.
Chile momos at Tasty Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

The name of Tasty Mo:Mo, a fast-casual Magoun Square spot, gets right to the point; momo lovers will find, yes, plenty of tasty dumplings here, available with beef, chicken, pork, vegan, or aloo (potato) fillings. Get them steamed, pan-fried, deep-fried, in a vegetable-based soup, jhol-style, or chile-style, which packs some serious heat. Chow mein, thukpa (noodle soup), special-occasion sel roti, and a few other items round out the menu.

Closeup shot of a few steamed dumplings in a thick red sauce that looks very spicy. The dumplings are sitting on aluminum foil.
Chile momos at Tasty Momo.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Martsa on Elm

Davis Square staple Martsa on Elm, serving Tibetan food in Somerville for nearly 20 years, moved into a swankier new space a few doors down in late 2020. The full-service restaurant offers beer and wine alongside its lengthy food menu, with the momo selection including beef, chicken, or vegetable filling. They’re served steamed or pan-fried and make for a great starter before digging into Martsa’s curries, noodle dishes, and more. Try the butter tea or ginger honey lime tea for a warming accompaniment.

Bridges Nepali Cuisine

Winthrop restaurant Bridges Nepali Cuisine aims to bridge (get it?) communities “through food, spices, and art.” On the food side, there are chicken or vegetable momos, available steamed (with or without chile sauce), or pan-fried, alongside a variety of other Nepali dishes.

Momo N Curry

Eight plump round steamed dumplings are nestled in a black plastic takeout bowl with a side of naan.
Steamed buffalo momos and garlic naan from Momo N Curry.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This friendly counter-service Union Square restaurant — sibling to Cafe Momo in Manchester, New Hampshire — serves a mix of Indian and Nepali cuisine and offers a bit of seating for dining onsite (with a kettle full of complimentary chai), as well as takeout and delivery. For meat eaters, the buffalo momos are the play here, while vegetarians should try the spinach and paneer, plantain, or vegetable. Chicken, goat, and lamb fillings are also available.

Eight plump round steamed dumplings are nestled in a black plastic takeout bowl with a side of naan.
Steamed buffalo momos and garlic naan from Momo N Curry.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Himalayan Kitchen

Overhead view of eight round dumplings in an aluminum to-go container, sitting in a spicy sauce with sauteed red onions.
Spicy pan-fried momos from Himalayan Kitchen.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Another Union Square spot, the casual Himalayan Kitchen offers a mix of Nepali, Indian, and American dishes, including some fusion — think chicken tikka “naanwiches” and palak paneer pizza. For momos, choose from vegetable, chicken, or pork, served steamed, pan-fried, johl-style, or spicy c-style. The counter-service restaurant is mostly geared toward takeout and delivery, but there’s a little bit of seating (and some nice decor) for dine-in. The lunch specials, served daily, are a solid deal.

Overhead view of eight round dumplings in an aluminum to-go container, sitting in a spicy sauce with sauteed red onions.
Spicy pan-fried momos from Himalayan Kitchen.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Base Crave

Eight plump steamed round dumplings sit on an orange plate, circled around a small bowl of a thick orange sauce.
Momos at Base Crave.
Base Crave

Cambridge’s Base Crave, sibling to Mitho in Winchester, leans Nepali with dishes like momos and choila, although the restaurant’s stated cuisine is “fusion gourmet...cuisines from all around the world.” Base Crave serves its momos steamed, with a choice of chicken, vegetable, paneer and spinach, lamb, buffalo, or wild boar filling. (The vegetable filling is vegetarian.)

Eight plump steamed round dumplings sit on an orange plate, circled around a small bowl of a thick orange sauce.
Momos at Base Crave.
Base Crave

Chulo Restaurant & Bar

Over in Watertown, Chulo has been serving Nepali and Indian food since 2017. Named for a traditional Nepali stove made of mud, the restaurant also has a full bar and frequently hosts live music in a variety of genres. Momo lovers will find a few different chicken and vegetable options, including steamed and pan-fried, with or without chile sauce.

Kantipur Cafe

Overhead view of an aluminum circular takeout container full of round, slightly charred dumplings. A big round cup of a thick orange drink sits to the side.
Pan-fried momos and a mango lassi from Kantipur Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Cambridge’s Kantipur Cafe serves Nepali and Indian cuisine. (When it opened earlier in the pandemic, there were pizzas and subs, too, a nod to the owners’ pizzerias they ran in Michigan before moving to Massachusetts, but the menu has since been simplified.) Chicken or vegetable momos come steamed, pan-fried, jhol-style, chile-style, or charred in the tandoori oven.

Overhead view of an aluminum circular takeout container full of round, slightly charred dumplings. A big round cup of a thick orange drink sits to the side.
Pan-fried momos and a mango lassi from Kantipur Cafe.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Rangzen Tibetan Place

Overhead view of several takeout containers with a beef and potato dish and oblong, slightly browned dumplings.
Pan-fried luksha (lamb) momos (right) from Rangzen, with a beef and potato dish and fruit salad.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Open for over 20 years in Cambridge’s Central Square, Rangzen boasts a large Tibetan menu and cozy dine-in vibes equally suitable for a casual meal with friends or a date night. The restaurant’s momos come steamed with house-made hot sauce and a small soup on the side; fillings include vegetables, chicken, beef, or lamb. Try some butter tea to drink. Take home some frozen momos in a pack of 25 or 50.

Overhead view of several takeout containers with a beef and potato dish and oblong, slightly browned dumplings.
Pan-fried luksha (lamb) momos (right) from Rangzen, with a beef and potato dish and fruit salad.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Trident Booksellers & Cafe

Unlike the other restaurants on this map, Trident isn’t Nepali or Tibetan; it’s a bookstore and cafe serving a sizable American diner-style menu. But vegetarian momos have been periodically offered since way back in 1992, introduced by employee Tsering Wangdi, who became known as the “Momo Man.” They returned to the menu in 2021 when another Tibetan chef joined the kitchen staff. The restaurant’s new “Momo Gal” is using Wangdi’s original recipe. When available, Trident’s momos are served steamed or fried with soy sauce and peanut sauce.

House of Tandoor

Located in Newton Centre, this spacious restaurant and bar offers a mix of Indian and Nepali dishes, including momos. They come steamed and filled with chicken, vegetables, lamb, or plantain — the plantain momos are vegan — and are available in orders of five or 10. Also of note: There’s a brunch buffet on weekends and a lunch buffet during the week.

Related Maps

Himalayan Bistro

Serving a mix of Indian and Nepali food, West Roxbury’s Himalayan Bistro offers steamed momos with vegetable, chicken, lamb, or plantain filling. The latter is vegan. There’s a lunch buffet at Himalayan Bistro, and the restaurant also hosts private events in a function room that fits up to 100.

Related Maps