clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
Overhead view of a New York-style pepperoni pizza
A pepperoni pizza at Armando’s.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Where to Eat Excellent Pizza in Greater Boston

From old-school classics to fancy wood-fired pies

View as Map
A pepperoni pizza at Armando’s.
| Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

People love to complain about Boston’s pizza scene, especially when compared with some larger cities, but there are actually plenty of incredible options around town, from decades-old classic pizzerias to the recent wave of wood-fired obsession — and everything in between.

Here are some of the spots that showcase the best of today’s Boston-area pizza world. In the interest of keeping to a fairly tight radius around Boston, this map omits the excellent South Shore bar pizza scene, which has its own separate map.

Further reading:

For all the latest Boston dining intel, subscribe to Eater Boston’s newsletter.

This map was was originally published on July 28, 2017 and is updated periodically; the date of the most recent update appears above.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Avenue Kitchen & Bar

Copy Link

Detroit-style pizza can be...divisive. Those who swear by New York-style slices or coal-fired New Haven pizza, for example, may dismiss it untasted, furrowing a brow at the buried toppings or the drizzle of sauce on top or the unfamiliar look of Wisconsin brick cheese. But those who appreciate the unique pan pizza — which does bear some similarity to the South Shore bar pizzas more familiar to many Bostonians, perhaps blended with a Sicilian pie — will find a lot to love at Avenue, a lively neighborhood spot in Somerville’s Ball Square.

Overhead view of a rectangular pepperoni pizza, with two horizontal strips of tomato sauce across
Pepperoni Detroit-style pizza at Avenue.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Dragon Pizza

Copy Link

Food lovers from Roslindale and beyond may remember chef Charlie Redd from the now-closed Redd’s in Rozzie; these days, he’s in Somerville’s Davis Square, serving up some of the tastiest pizzas around at Dragon Pizza. It has old-school sub shop vibes but a full bar and a lot of heart, not to mention house-made gelato.

Overhead view of a pepperoni pizza in a takeout box on a red and white table.
A takeout pepperoni pizza from Dragon Pizza in Somerville’s Davis Square.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This elegant full-service restaurant in Somerville’s Davis Square is sibling to the nearby Rosebud and Painted Burro, as well several other restaurants. Posto serves gorgeous Neapolitan-style pizzas — everything from a classic margherita to seasonal specials such as a local ramp pizza with mozzarella, applewood smoked bacon, an egg, parmesan, and maple syrup. There’s plenty more on the menu, too, and the restaurant has also been known to host whole pig roasts. Follow chef Juan G. Perez on Instagram for a peek at Posto’s pizza process.

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a leopard-spotted, puffy crust. Toppings include pepperoni and basil.
Pepperoni pizza at Posto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Ciao Pizza and Pasta

Copy Link

Ciao opened in Chelsea in 2015, quickly gaining acclaim for its outstanding wood-fired, Neapolitan-style pizza. It’s a tiny storefront, but there’s a bit of counter seating inside and a few seats outdoors in warmer seasons. (Try a Nutella pizza for dessert. Why not?)

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a black-speckled crust, topped with ground sausage, blobs of mozzarella, and slices of cherry peppers
Salsiccia pizza (cherry peppers and house-made fennel sausage) at Ciao.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Gran Gusto

Copy Link

Hidden in a quiet section of Cambridge nestled between Fresh Pond and Porter Square, Gran Gusto, which opened in 2007, is a full-service restaurant serving Neapolitan-style pizza, pasta, and a few hefty entrees. In its early years, it got a bit of a reputation for surly service (although most agreed that the pizza was worth it), but the restaurant has turned over a friendlier new leaf since then — and the pizza is as good as ever, if not better. Save room for a pasta dish, too, especially the lasagna, paccheri, or chitarra.

Pizza topped with pepperoni and blobs of mozzarella, served on a white plate on a table with a white tablecloth.
Diavola pizza at Gran Gusto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Armando's Pizza

Copy Link

Serving Cambridge’s Huron Village since 1971, Armando’s is that type of pizzeria with the simple wooden booths and kids’ soccer team photos on the walls. There’s thin-crust pizza as well as Sicilian, plus subs, calzones, baked ziti, and more.

Partial view of a pepperoni pizza on a metal tray on a light-colored table
Pepperoni pizza at Armando’s.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Hot Box

Copy Link

Hot Box, one of the food vendors at Somerville’s Bow Market, is probably the definitive non-South Shore purveyor of South Shore-style bar pizza, serving up the perfect specimen of the old-school pan pizza with golden-brown cheese spots; a crispy, lacy outer edge; and a softer under-crust. If you’re dining with someone who doesn’t want pizza (but why would you?), Hot Box also serves excellent North Shore-style roast beef sandwiches, and there are also plenty of other Bow Market vendors with lots of other foods to eat and drinks to drink.

Overhead view of a pepperoni pizza in the style of Massachusetts’ South Shore-style bar pizza, with a barely-there, lacy, charred edge and bubbly brown cheese spots
Pepperoni pizza from Hot Box
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Brewer's Fork

Copy Link

Any halfway decent restaurant would have been a good addition to this section of Charlestown, which was sorely lacking in dining options — but Brewer’s Fork took it a few giant steps further when it opened in early 2015, giving the neighborhood a truly wonderful destination for wood-fired pizza, a spectacular beer list, a great patio, and a comfortable vibe.

overhead view of a pizza in a takeout pizza box topped with fresh basil, cherry tomatoes, and a meaty jam
A takeout pizza from Brewer’s Fork (the Bacon Jammy: bacon jam, cherry tomatoes, mozzarella, and basil).
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Just look at those ‘roni cups. Source — with a full-service restaurant in Harvard Square and a recently opened casual offshoot at Time Out Market Boston — debuted in late 2019, focusing on local sourcing (hence the name). Pizza is the main attraction on the gastropubby menu, with the pepperoni, garnished with caramelized red onions and vin cotto, claiming top billing on social media. But don’t stop there: Other enviable combinations include Tuscan kale with goat cheese, Rhode Island mushrooms, and hot honey or artichoke with smoked white sauce, shallot, and parsley.

A wood-fired pizza with charred crust and pepperoni cups is on a wooden table surrounded by assorted small plates.
Pepperoni pizza and more at Source in Harvard Square.
Source Restaurants

Santarpio's Pizza

Copy Link

Family-owned and operated since 1903 and serving pizza since 1933, Santarpio’s in East Boston is a no-frills landmark for New York-style pizza — and the few non-pizza items on the menu aren’t too shabby, either (lamb skewers, steak tips, and sausage made in-house, all served with hot cherry peppers and fresh bread). There’s also a newer location on Route 1 in Peabody.

The Santarpio’s building is light tan and has a giant sign on the side — dark brown with white and orange lettering — that reads “Santarpio’s Pizza Bar B-Q” and features a man holding a pizza
Santarpio’s in East Boston.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Regina Pizza

Copy Link

For better or worse, the Polcari family’s restaurant group has expanded significantly since the 1926 debut of Regina Pizza in the North End; these days, most locations are quick-service mall kiosks. But standing in line at the original full-service Thacher Street location is still an essential Boston pizza experience. Try the Giambotta pizza — topped with every traditional topping the restaurant offers — for a taste of Regina’s classic brick-oven pizza.

The exterior window of the original Regina Pizzeria location in Boston’s North End includes red and green neon signage that says “Regina,” as well as printed red, green, and white signage reading “Pizza to Go,” “Pizzeria Regina,” and “Beer & Wine.”
The original Regina Pizzeria location in Boston’s North End.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Galleria Umberto

Copy Link

For a true North End experience, head to this casual Hanover Street spot, which is only open for lunch (closed Sundays, and generally closed for vacation for a substantial chunk of the summer; the 2022 break is from July 3 to August 1). The lines are long but move quickly for the Sicilian slices and arancini — and that’s almost entirely the menu, plus beer and wine and a few other food items. Cash only. In 2018, the James Beard Foundation proclaimed it an “American classic.”

A man in a blue shirt with white stripes and a white hat and apron serves Sicilian-style pizza at a counter. A Coca-Cola fridge is visible in the background.
Pizza at Galleria Umberto.
Katie Chudy/Eater

Area Four

Copy Link

The perfect example of Boston’s wood-fired pizza renaissance, Area Four serves up beautiful pies with a heavily blistered crust that benefits from a 30-plus-hour ferment and a sourdough starter. Try the carnivore pizza, topped with big, spicy pieces of sopressata as well as sausage and bacon.

A closeup shot of a soppressata-topped pizza with a puffy, charred crust
“Not pepperoni” pizza (soppressata) at Area Four.
Area Four

Florina Pizzeria & Paninoteca

Copy Link

This Beacon Hill favorite — an essential lunch spot for the many workers in the neighborhood — serves absolutely enormous slices of thin-crust pizza. Taking a day off from pizza? Try the chicken parm sub. The small shop is primarily a takeout and delivery joint, but there’s a bit of seating, too.

Overhead view of a giant slice of cheese pizza on a paper plate on a wooden counter
“One” slice of cheese at Florina.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Max & Leo's

Copy Link

Max & Leo’s coal-fired pizzas cook within minutes around 900 degrees and come out with a markedly blistered crust; those who don’t love pizza cooked well-done should go elsewhere. Nachos are also coal-fired, and there are a variety of roasted wings available, plus salads, sandwiches, and more. There are a couple more locations in the area, but Newton is the original.

A pizza with a black-speckled puffy crust is held on a light wooden pizza peel in front of a coal-fired pizza oven
Pizza at Max & Leo’s.
Max & Leo’s

Da LaPosta Pizzeria

Copy Link

Babbo Pizzeria e Enoteca alum Mario LaPosta, who has developed serious pizza skills over the years, now has his own restaurant, Da LaPosta, where he focuses on wood-fired pizza but embellishes the menu with pasta and a bit more. Watch for pizza options like the bianca (fig jam, lardo, pecorino, arugula) and the bagna cauda (house-made sausage, escarole, bufala mozzarella, garlic, anchovy).

Closeup on a Margherita pizza with a slightly charred, wood-fired crust and a fresh basil topping.
Pizza at Da LaPosta.
Da LaPosta

Pastoral

Copy Link

This full-service Fort Point restaurant serves a wide range of Neapolitan-style pizzas (any of which can be made gluten-free), topped with everything from fennel sausage to jalapenos. There’s plenty of pasta, too (also available gluten-free), along with wood-fired garlic knots and focaccia, sfizi and antipasti, and more.

Photo of a restaurant interior, including a shiny red pizza oven with wood stacked behind it
Pastoral.
Katie Chudy/Eater

Picco’s name is actually an acronym — Pizza and Ice Cream Company — and the popular South End restaurant does both things exceedingly well. The pizza is a dream come true for bread lovers thanks to its prominent, puffy crust, which gets just the right amount of char.

Closeup shot of a charred, thick pepperoni pizza, where the pepperoni is curled up into little cups
Pepperoni pizza at Picco.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Stoked Pizza

Copy Link

The popular wood-fired pizza truck expanded to a full-service restaurant in mid-2016, serving up a variety of pizzas, wings, and other snacks. Almost any pizza can be made gluten-free, and there’s a substantial vegan menu as well. Pro tip: Request the Peruvian tear drop peppers from the Stoked salad as a pizza topping. (Stoked now has a Cambridge sibling, too; the pizza at that location isn’t wood-fired, but it is also fantastic.)

A pizza at Stoked, featuring chopped up pepperoni (not round slices) and drizzled with Mike’s Hot Honey
Pepperoni pizza with hot honey drizzle at Stoked
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Pino's Pizza

Copy Link

A Cleveland Circle standby since 1962, Pino’s serves New York-style slices, along with Sicilian pizza, calzones, and more. While the counter-service spot is primarily geared towards takeout, there are plenty of tables inside for those who want to stay.

Two slices of New York-style pepperoni pizza sit on two white paper plates on a speckled blue-gray table
Pepperoni pizza at Pino’s.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Jinny's Pizzeria

Copy Link

This Newton newcomer — it opened in 2021 — comes from a team with a deep Newton fanbase already, the same folks behind Sycamore, Buttonwood, and Little Big Diner. The love for Jinny’s wood-fired pizza is already catching up with its big siblings, thanks to a slow-fermented dough and a solid selection of both red and white pies. (Try anything topped with Ezzo pepperoni.)

Overhead view of five overlapping pizzas, some up on stands, with spotted, wood-fired crusts.
A selection of pizzas at Jinny’s.
Jinny’s Pizza

Venice Pizza

Copy Link

Open since 2021, Venice Pizza is a reboot of a decades-old Savin Hill classic that closed in 2019. The new ownership team includes Todd Winer, who is also behind Fort Point wood-fired pizza gem Pastoral (see above), but the style here is something else entirely — and just as good in its own way. This is more of a thin-crust, New York-inspired pizza. The milk-based dough gets a 48-hour ferment and comes out rich, with a bubbly and lightly blistered edge.

A freshly baked pizza held up by a stainless steel pizza peel, backdropped by a pair of deck ovens
Venice Pizza.
Venice Pizza

Molinari's

Copy Link

The wood-fired, brick-oven pizza is the star at this neighborhood favorite, but the rest of the Italian comfort food menu is a hit, too. Molinari’s opened in Adams Village in 2016, and the pizzas — which feature a pleasantly charred crust — include options like the clam (olive oil, garlic, fresh Wellfleet clams, fontina, mozzarella, chile oil) and the meat lover (tomato sauce, house-made Italian sausage, pepperoni, hamburger, and caramelized onions).

Overhead view of a round pizza, uncut, with a charred crust and toppings including herbs, garlic, and meatballs.
Pizza at Molinari’s.
Molinari’s

Pleasant Cafe

Copy Link

The pizza at Pleasant Cafe is beloved in Roslindale and beyond. Its mushroom and onion pizza (the onions are impossibly thin, which is the best way to do onions on pizza) is the move. Pleasant Cafe also offers a full menu, which includes a killer rendition of broiled scallops.

Overhead view of a thin-crust pizza topped with green peppers on a wooden table. One slice of the pizza has been removed.
Pizza at Pleasant Cafe.
Terrence B. Doyle/Eater

Avenue Kitchen & Bar

Overhead view of a rectangular pepperoni pizza, with two horizontal strips of tomato sauce across
Pepperoni Detroit-style pizza at Avenue.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Detroit-style pizza can be...divisive. Those who swear by New York-style slices or coal-fired New Haven pizza, for example, may dismiss it untasted, furrowing a brow at the buried toppings or the drizzle of sauce on top or the unfamiliar look of Wisconsin brick cheese. But those who appreciate the unique pan pizza — which does bear some similarity to the South Shore bar pizzas more familiar to many Bostonians, perhaps blended with a Sicilian pie — will find a lot to love at Avenue, a lively neighborhood spot in Somerville’s Ball Square.

Overhead view of a rectangular pepperoni pizza, with two horizontal strips of tomato sauce across
Pepperoni Detroit-style pizza at Avenue.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Dragon Pizza

Overhead view of a pepperoni pizza in a takeout box on a red and white table.
A takeout pepperoni pizza from Dragon Pizza in Somerville’s Davis Square.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Food lovers from Roslindale and beyond may remember chef Charlie Redd from the now-closed Redd’s in Rozzie; these days, he’s in Somerville’s Davis Square, serving up some of the tastiest pizzas around at Dragon Pizza. It has old-school sub shop vibes but a full bar and a lot of heart, not to mention house-made gelato.

Overhead view of a pepperoni pizza in a takeout box on a red and white table.
A takeout pepperoni pizza from Dragon Pizza in Somerville’s Davis Square.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Posto

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a leopard-spotted, puffy crust. Toppings include pepperoni and basil.
Pepperoni pizza at Posto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

This elegant full-service restaurant in Somerville’s Davis Square is sibling to the nearby Rosebud and Painted Burro, as well several other restaurants. Posto serves gorgeous Neapolitan-style pizzas — everything from a classic margherita to seasonal specials such as a local ramp pizza with mozzarella, applewood smoked bacon, an egg, parmesan, and maple syrup. There’s plenty more on the menu, too, and the restaurant has also been known to host whole pig roasts. Follow chef Juan G. Perez on Instagram for a peek at Posto’s pizza process.

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a leopard-spotted, puffy crust. Toppings include pepperoni and basil.
Pepperoni pizza at Posto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Ciao Pizza and Pasta

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a black-speckled crust, topped with ground sausage, blobs of mozzarella, and slices of cherry peppers
Salsiccia pizza (cherry peppers and house-made fennel sausage) at Ciao.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Ciao opened in Chelsea in 2015, quickly gaining acclaim for its outstanding wood-fired, Neapolitan-style pizza. It’s a tiny storefront, but there’s a bit of counter seating inside and a few seats outdoors in warmer seasons. (Try a Nutella pizza for dessert. Why not?)

Closeup of Neapolitan-style pizza with a black-speckled crust, topped with ground sausage, blobs of mozzarella, and slices of cherry peppers
Salsiccia pizza (cherry peppers and house-made fennel sausage) at Ciao.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Gran Gusto

Pizza topped with pepperoni and blobs of mozzarella, served on a white plate on a table with a white tablecloth.
Diavola pizza at Gran Gusto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Hidden in a quiet section of Cambridge nestled between Fresh Pond and Porter Square, Gran Gusto, which opened in 2007, is a full-service restaurant serving Neapolitan-style pizza, pasta, and a few hefty entrees. In its early years, it got a bit of a reputation for surly service (although most agreed that the pizza was worth it), but the restaurant has turned over a friendlier new leaf since then — and the pizza is as good as ever, if not better. Save room for a pasta dish, too, especially the lasagna, paccheri, or chitarra.

Pizza topped with pepperoni and blobs of mozzarella, served on a white plate on a table with a white tablecloth.
Diavola pizza at Gran Gusto.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Armando's Pizza

Partial view of a pepperoni pizza on a metal tray on a light-colored table
Pepperoni pizza at Armando’s.
Rachel Leah Blumenthal/Eater

Serving Cambridge’s Huron Village since 1971, Armando’s is that type of pizzeria with the simple wooden booths and kids’ soccer team photos on the walls. There’s thin-crust pizza as well as Sicilian, plus subs, calzones, baked ziti, and more.