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The Team Behind Field & Vine Is Now Slinging Wood-Fired Pizzas In Somerville’s Union Square

June Bug is a colorful, quirky addition to Washington Street

A pizza with a blistered crust positioned on top of a tomato can.
The Shuggie’s pizza, with tomato, mozzerella, basil schug, and pecorino cheese.
Leonard Greco/June Bug
Erika Adams is the editor of Eater Boston.

Somerville’s Union Square is a home for showcasing culinary talent, from the up-and-coming chefs that rotate through Bow Market to nearby crowd-favorites like cocktail hotspot Backbar, ice cream shop Honeycomb Creamery, and beloved, award-winning restaurant Juliet. Union Square fixtures Andrew Brady and Sara Markey, the co-owners behind date night favorite Field & Vine, are now adding another restaurant to the mix. The pair has taken over a former Union Square pizza shop that closed earlier this year, T&B Pizza, and transformed it into the casual weeknight hangout June Bug, which just opened at 251 Washington Street.

Brady, who is also a co-owner of the acclaimed wine bar Dear Annie, is known for working with ingredients that spotlight New England seasonality at Field & Vine. He takes a similar approach at June Bug: Find zingy seafood plates here like a fluke and scallop tartare with sunflower greens, sunchoke chips, pear, celery root, and a Tamari aioli, alongside fun vegetable preparations like the kale salad, which sees the crunchy greens tossed with a swordfish tonnato, capers, fennel, crunchy garlic, and nutritional yeast.

A plate loaded with slices of mushrooms and onions showered in cheese shavings.
A mushroom salad with raw creminis, beech mushrooms, shaved white onion, and Mimolette cheese.
Leonard Greco/June Bug

But the star of the show at June Bug is the wood-fired pizza oven that Brady and Markey inherited from T&B. From that powerhouse oven, the team is hauling out blistered, Neapolitan-style pizzas that run the gamut from the almost-familiar like Shuggie’s, with tomato, mozzarella, pecorino, and basil shug (a bright, herby hot sauce originating from Yemen), to more quirky combinations like the Chimney Sweep, which features a spazza di camino cheese (named after an Italian town famous for its chimney sweeps), spoonfuls of pine nut agrodolce, and “as much spinach as we can [put] on it,” Brady says.

A pizza covered in spinach and a pine nut condiment sits on top of a tomato can pedestal.
The Chimney Sweep.
Leonard Greco/June Bug
A pizza with a puffy crust topped with tomato sauce, diced onions, ‘nduja, and marjoram, set on top of a tomato can.
The “Like a Pepperoni” with ‘nduja, marjoram, and onions.
Leonard Greco/June Bug

The bar is stocked with natural wines, New England beers including Vermont’s Foam Brewers and Remnant Brewing in Bow Market, and a handful of classic cocktails to start. June Bug’s full liquor license is a first for the team, which only operates with a beer and wine license at Field & Vine.

The space itself, designed largely by Brady and Markey, is marked by a cheeky blend of bright pinks, greens, and yellows that intentionally set June Bug apart from Field & Vine’s more hushed, neutral tones. “I was kind of excited to get to play with more color,” Markey says.

A circular pile of raw seafood topped by crispy brown chips on a white plate decorated with wavy blue stripes.
A fluke and bay scallop tartare with sunchoke chips.
Leonard Greco/June Bug
A close-up photo of a well-dressed green salad with croutons and chickpeas visible.
The kitchen sink salad with chickpeas, olives, dates, pickles, pecorino croutons, and farm greens.
Leonard Greco/June Bug

June Bug is located just a few steps from Field & Vine, and Brady and Markey are working with the same landlord for both spaces. The pair say they were interested in taking over the space around the corner because they want to keep promoting small business growth in the area. With a shiny new high-rise looming in the background of Washington Street, and more real estate development on the way, the independent operators felt strongly about re-investing in the area. “We’ve been working in this neighborhood for 10 years now,” Brady says. “We just don’t want to see small businesses kind of disappear.”